The Worst Pickup Truck Of All-Time Can’t Carry The Load

Pickup Trucks are one of the most popular vehicles in the United States. Built to carry nearly any load, they are perfect vehicles for almost any job. From towing a boat for a day out on the lake to transporting work supplies from point A to point B, there isn’t much these beasts can’t do. But what happens when the manufacturer puts quantity over quality or rushes a new truck to market? You end up with some of the worst pickup trucks of all-time.

From constant breakdowns, cars pretending to be trucks, and awfully low-performance grades from consumers and reviewers, keep reading to find out which ones are among the worst of the worst.

Ford F-150

Ford Rollout First 2004 F-150 Pickup Truck In Norfolk, VA
Mike Heffner/Getty Images
Mike Heffner/Getty Images

One of the most popular vehicles in America is the Ford F-150. Just because it sells like hotcakes doesn’t mean it is without problems. Owners who bought model years 2004 and 2005 F-150s were not happy about their purchases.

In those specific models, owners complained about the windows and, more importantly, failed transmissions. Those problems, among others, led to massive recalls, making this one of the biggest mistakes in Ford’s history.

RAM 1500

The 2013 Dodge Ram 1500 is introduced du
STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images
STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images

Joining the list of RAM trucks you want to avoid at all costs in the RAM 1500. The 1500 preceded the 3500 and set the tone of just how bad this line of pickups was going to be.

Owners of RAM 1500s cited transmission failures, engine failures, and oil sludge build up as consistent issues. They also noted the truck was poorly built and it wasn’t uncommon for dashboards to crack or interior electronics to fail.

Ford Explorer Sport Trac

New York International Auto Show Debuts Latest Automobiles
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Mario Tama/Getty Images

We still aren’t sure what the point of the Ford Explorer Sport Trac was. It was only produced for four years, which felt like four years too many. To manufacture the Sport Trac, Ford took one of their most popular SUVs and modified it into a pickup truck.

The truck’s flat bed was too small, and Ford tried to charge an arm and a leg with an MSRP sticker price that customers weren’t interested in.

GMC Canyon

2014 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The GMC Canyon was built as an upscale pickup truck that would last for the rest of your life. Of course, that’s not true or it wouldn’t be on this list. Consumers reported problems with the fuel system, cabin electronics, and transmission.

To help compete against its rivals, GMC offered the Canyon in a variety of colors and sizes. In the case of this truck, customers preferred quality over quantity.

1997 Ford Ranger

49102721056_5cd6192363_c
RL GNZLZ/Flickr
RL GNZLZ/Flickr

Ford has always been known for producing some of the best pickup trucks you can buy, which made the misstep of the 1997 Ranger very strange. The biggest mistake Ford made with the Ranger was including a transmission that was anything but reliable.

Reported problems for the failed transmission included: gear slipping, solenoid failure, delayed gear shift response, upshift failure, loss of gears, and loss of reverse gear. It’s hard to find success if your product barely works!

Chevy Avalanche

The Olympic Torch gets transported
Todd Warshaw/Pool/Getty Images
Todd Warshaw/Pool/Getty Images

The Chevy Avalanche was in production from 2001 until 2013. During that time, two generations of the pickup truck were produced. Even though the truck stayed in production for over a decade, there’s a reason you can only find it on the secondary market today.

Consumers who owned the Avalanche complained about speedometer malfunctions, which led to being pulled over and getting tickets. Other problems were the vehicle’s excessive oil consumption and questionable transmission.

2006 Nissan Frontier

4569952782_5b34485594_b
Donnie Ray Jones/Flickr
Donnie Ray Jones/Flickr

As much as we would like to forget about the 2006 Nissan Frontier, it’s impossible. The pickup truck was noted for having awful transmission issues. And did we mention there were seven factory recalls?

Three of those recalls turned out to be big problems for Nissan. They involved the vehicle’s suspension, fuel system, and engine, all of which had failures linked to crashes. If you see one of these on the secondary market, now you know why.

1976 Dodge Ramcharger

27758998154_7c1afee2f9_k
Alden Jewell/Flickr
Alden Jewell/Flickr

The Dodge Ramcharger was first released in 1974, but it’s the 1976 model year that really missed the mark. Originally known as the “Rhino,” the Ramcharger was filled with odd quirks, including a passenger seat that was optional and not standard.

The driver’s seat, of course, came standard, but if you preferred to drive in solitude that was more than possible. While getting rid of the passenger seat increased the carrying room, customers just weren’t impressed. Pictured here is a Ramcharger with the flat hard top option.

2009 Hummer H3T

6060283128_6ce856a211_k
DiamondBack Covers/Flickr
DiamondBack Covers/Flickr

The Hummer is famous for being a military vehicle that became in such high demand by non-military personnel that it eventually was redesigned and released to the public. For years it sat at the top of the market — then the 2009 H3T model was released.

The H3T was expensive and featured a terrible miles-per-gallon fuel efficiency rating. As gas prices rose, consumers wanted smaller cars that could push 30 to 40 miles per gallon, effectively turning the H3T into a mistake that nearly killed the brand.

1978 Subaru BRAT

2020 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Subaru has a reputation for releasing some of the best vehicles on the market. From sedans to SUVs to everything but trucks, Subaru makes excellent vehicles. The BRAT was a truck, a market the brand has never been able to corner.

The big issue is a misunderstanding of what makes a pickup truck an actual truck. The BRAT was a sedan that was rebranded as a compact truck, which was not good. Oddly enough, the BRAT stayed popular for two decades and has a surprising secondary market value today. It made our list because, again, it’s not a truck!

RAM Rumble Bee

Los Angeles Kicks Off International Car Show
Scott Halleran/Getty Images
Scott Halleran/Getty Images

The RAM Rumble Bee has one of the most ridiculous names on this list. What exactly was Dodge thinking when they made a bumblebee yellow pickup truck and added it to their lineup?

Dodge released the Rumble Bee in 2004, trying to jump on the success of Super Bee muscle cars. Aside from the paint job and decals, there was nothing under the hood that could separate this truck from the rest of its class.

Lincoln Blackwood

J Mays Ford Motor's Vp Of Design Debut The New Lincoln Conc
John T. Barr/Getty Images
John T. Barr/Getty Images

The Lincoln Blackwood wasn’t just one of the worst pickup trucks ever released, it was also one of the strangest. Known for their luxury, Lincoln created pickup with an undersized bed and an underpowered engine.

The Blackwood, aside from being oddly shaped, was also unreliable. Blue collar workers stayed away, and so did Lincoln’s core consumer base. At the end of the day, the Blackwood only lasted one generation before Lincoln discontinued production altogether.

1999 Chevy Silverado

15288973232_292176147c_k
Rutger van der Maar/Flickr
Rutger van der Maar/Flickr

The Chevy Silverado is an iconic pickup that almost missed the mark entirely. When it was first introduced in 1999, it was a release nightmare that Chevy barely woke up from.

Chevy put one of the worst engines on the market in the Silverado, which seems like an odd choice for what was intended to be a new flagship vehicle. The lack of power made the pickup truck slow and unreliable, a mistake the automaker quickly remedied with the next generation.

Chevrolet Colorado

Detroit Auto Show
Todd Korol/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Todd Korol/Toronto Star via Getty Images

In theory, the idea of a compact pickup truck makes sense. In practice, they are rarely hits with consumers, and the Chevy Colorado was no different. It was fuel-efficient and easy to drive, but also received poor reliability ratings.

Most of the problems look to be put in the past by Chevy, as the 2019 Colorado has received mostly positive remarks. So, if you’re looking for a compact truck, go for the 2019 model year or later.

2006 Dodge Dakota

7563501514_d928373355_b
Greg Goebel/Flickr
Greg Goebel/Flickr

Dodge completely redesigned the Dakota for 2006, an idea which turned out to be a huge misstep for the automaker. The new model stayed on the market for five years, when Dodge discontinued the Dakota entirely.

What was so disastrous about the 2006 Dakota? While it was a reasonably priced pickup truck, consumers reported it broke down constantly. The cost of repairs quickly added up, turning a modest initial investment into a bank account nightmare.

Nissan Titan

Prominent Condo Developers
Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

The Nissan Titan undeniably looks like an incredible truck. It’s big and has aggressive styling that instantly catches the eye. It’s also one of the worst-performing pickup trucks on the market.

Most of the truck’s problems can be attributed to the pulleys, mounts, and belts. Some owners have also experienced cracks in the body and fluid leaks. None of that adds up to a truck that is worth the money, which explains why it can often be found at discounted prices.

Ram 3500

at the Canadian International Auto Show
Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images

According to Consumer Reports, the Ram 3500 is the “least reliable vehicle you can buy.” While it looks like it can take a beating and keep on keeping on the outside, anyone foolish enough to buy one learned how big of a mistake they made.

The biggest reported issues with the 3500 were the vehicle’s steering, transmission, fuel system, and suspension. All of those components are kind of important when it comes to driving.

2018 Mercedes Benz X-Class

98th European Motor Show
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

When Mercedes released the X-Class, they billed it as the first true luxury pickup truck experience. Sadly, despite coming out in 2018, the truck is already proving to be a mistake by the usually reliable German automaker.

When Top Gear reviewed the X-Class, it was called, “meh.” The highly respected auto program also noted, “kick down accounts for a two-elephant count before anything happens, and even then you aren’t exactly subjected to forceful acceleration.”

1957 Ford Ranchero

1957 Ford Ranchero Road Test
Eric Rickman/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images
Eric Rickman/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images

In 1957, Ford tried to fool consumers with the Ranchero. A wolf in sheep’s clothing, the Ranchero was essentially a sedan with a truck bed. Ford sold the auto as a pickup truck, though, and consumers picked up and took their business elsewhere.

By 1960, Ford realized they made a mistake. The company created a smaller more compact Ranchero and marketed it to consumers as a car this time, not a pickup truck.

Chevy SSR

Chevrolet SSR pickup at the CIAS- Canadian International Auto Show in Toronto Feb 14-23 2003 . Feb 1
David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images
David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images

What exactly was the Chevy SSR? An odd hybrid of a pickup truck and a sedan, the retro-style vehicle was eye-catching, but not in a good way. At the end of the day, consumers didn’t know what they were looking at.

Anyone looking for a pickup truck who bought an SSR was disappointed at its lack of hauling power. And since that was the target market, Chevy was forced to end production after three years.

1976 Cadillac Mirage

19895186922_e921625f6d_k
_salguod/Flickr
_salguod/Flickr

We can 100 percent confirm that in 1976, the Cadillac Mirage was not a dream. The pickup truck was more of a coupe-truck hybrid than a pure hauler. The back seats were replaced with a flatbed, and Cadillac slapped a high price tag on the auto that turned away customers.

The Mirage was so disliked by consumers that Cadillac only produced a few hundred, scrapping the mode altogether and pretending it never existed.

2006 Honda Ridgeline

49242222841_16387f2f9c_k
Rutger van der Maar/Flickr
Rutger van der Maar/Flickr

Honda made its first attempt to enter the pickup truck market in 2006 with the Ridgeline. The truck was built from the ground up and took four years to design. And for all the hard work Honda’s designers put into the car, it was labeled a lemon as soon as it was released.

Reviewers reviled the truck, with one writing, “The Ridgeline can’t really do what most people who like trucks need it to do. Sure, some homeowners and weekend warriors may actually need a 10,000-lb towing capacity, but the Honda Ridgeline is probably just right for most.”

2005 Toyota Tundra

22034194_9901cc4e5d_b
Mr TGT/Flickr
Mr TGT/Flickr

Today, the Toyota Tundra is considered one of the best pickup trucks on the market. In 2005, the truck was nearly running itself off the road. Toyota first introduced the Tundra in 2000, and five years later nearly had to discontinue the model entirely.

The 2005 Tundra was one of the least powerful trucks for its size, which crushed its market share. In 2007, Toyota overhauled the Tundra entirely, giving consumers everything they asked for.

2002 Subaru Baja

14335828400_bf00f1e8d4_k
RL GNZLZ/Flickr
RL GNZLZ/Flickr

What a strange vehicle the Subaru Baja was. The automaker introduced it in 2002 as a pickup built for adventure seekers. Praised upon its release by the industry, consumers weren’t so kind to the niche auto.

The Baja struggled to meet sales productions and only stayed on the market for four years. While we appreciate the valiant attempt from Subaru to try and create a new market for pickup trucks, we can’t ignore the overall failure that followed.

Ford Thames Trader

Loading a Ford Thames Trader tipper lorry, Finningley, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire, 1966. Artist: Michael Walters
Paul Walters Worldwide Photography Ltd./Heritage Images/Getty Images
Paul Walters Worldwide Photography Ltd./Heritage Images/Getty Images

A pickup truck lesser-known in the United States was the Ford Thames Trader. Ford ended manufacturing of the truck in 1965 after eight failed years mostly on the English market.

Oddly enough, the Thames Trader was used to make double-decker busses for England, which are more well-known and popular. This list isn’t about busses, though, and the pickup truck version of the Trader is best forgotten in the pages of history.

GMC Sierra

2011 GMC Sierra Denali HD Unveiled
Sarah Conard/General Motors via Getty Images
Sarah Conard/General Motors via Getty Images

As the Chevy Silverado exploded in popularity (after its disastrous initial release), GMC decided they need a pickup truck that could compete with it. The GMC Sierra 2500HD was just that vehicle, and boy was it terrible.

The Sierra has never received strong consumer scores, with its biggest issue being poor reliability. Even though the truck can technically start any job you want to throw its way, there is no guarantee it will finish.

Dodge Ram Daytona

36534924576_9946a84e0f_k
Zytonits/Flickr
Zytonits/Flickr

Dodge released the Ram Daytona in 2005 with high hopes. It was an aggressively styled vehicle with hopes of bringing a new buyer to the legendary American automaker. The last thing Dodge expected was for their plan to backfire.

Dodge put so much attention into making the Ram Daytona a visual stunner, the company seemingly forget working people would be buying it too. Its hauling capacity was limited and its engine was severely underpowered.

Suzuki Equator

31692441060_b1d90add70_k
Jason Lawrence/Flickr
Jason Lawrence/Flickr

When Suzuki wanted to break into the American automobile market, they were right to think making a truck would be a great start. They were wrong with the truck they ended up developing – the Equator.

Suzuki asked Nissan for help when it began developing the Equator, and got exactly what they asked for – a Nissan. The Equator was a rebranded Nissan Frontier, and consumers noticed. After four years on the market, it was discontinued.

2013 Toyota Tacoma

8672078563_c0e7d45a17_k
zombieite/Flickr
zombieite/Flickr

The long-running Toyota Tacoma was beginning to show its age in 2013. After years of the market advancing, the Tacoma was falling behind, and the 2013 model offered very little improvements over its predecessor.

The new Tacoma had six recalls involving important parts. Three years after introducing the poorly received truck, Toyota re-hauled it and brought home the bacon with the 2016 Tacoma. This article isn’t about the best pickup trucks though. Sorry, Toyota.

1972 Ford Courier

Denver Post Archives
Denver Post via Getty Images
Denver Post via Getty Images

In 1972, Ford brought back the Courier pickup truck after a 12-year market absence. The truck was only a Ford by name though and was actually a Mazda that had been rebranded for the American automaker.

In other countries, the 1972 Ford Courier was sold as a Mazda B Series, because that’s what it was. Ford customers in the United States weren’t fooled and sales nosedived. Ford pulled the plug on the Courier after four years.

Ford F-250 And F-350

US-DETROIT AUTO SHOW-FORD SUPER CHIEF
JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images
JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images

It’s not just the Ford F-150 that had issues. The F-250 and F-350 have both had numerous issues reported over the years. Most common year models with issues include the 2006, 2008, and 2011 Ford pickup trucks.

The 2006 models had reported engine failures. In 2008, customers returned F-250s en masse because of a shaky suspension. The F-250s also had a particular issue with unintended acceleration and premature braking that needed to be addressed.

Dodge Dude

4781344883_204b8cd13a_k
dave_7/Flickr
dave_7/Flickr

You did not read that wrong. In 1969, Dodge released a pickup truck named Dude, and it was not a very well made truck. The Dude was a part of Dodge’s Sweptline pickup series and was essentially a D100 with special decals added on.

The Dodge doubled down on the failure in 2004, releasing a Dude version of the Durango. The Durango Dude was more functional than the original, but neither was anything to be excited about. It’s not even that they broke down, consumers just didn’t like them.

Chevy K2500

1920px-Chevrolet-CK
IFCAR/Wikimedia Commons
IFCAR/Wikimedia Commons

When Chevy first introduced the C/K series, they were great vehicles. That was back in 1959. As the years passed, so to did the attention Chevy put into this pickup truck, leading to the disaster that was the K2500 in 1997.

One owner complained that the truck rusted early on the cross-member underneath the driver and passenger seats. That is… not ideal when it comes to safety. It’s best to avoid this truck if you find it on the used market.

Mazda B Series

3120589341_1c461fe1bd_b
Dave Pinter/Flickr
Dave Pinter/Flickr

The Mazda B was a visually interesting looking pickup truck that was poised to be a hit for the automaker. Looks aren’t all that matter, however, especially when it comes to pickup trucks, and the B Series was sorely lacking under the hood.

The truck had limited hauling power and was marketed as a commuter vehicle instead of a blue-collar truck. Mazda missed the market entirely and ended up with easily one of the worst pickup trucks ever made.

Mitsubishi L200

49599943562_cdaf2e200d_k
Dennis Elzinga/Flickr
Dennis Elzinga/Flickr

The Mitsubishi L200 was originally sold in Japan as the Forte but was rebranded as the L200 in the United States. Designed to be able to handle small jobs, Mitsubishi completely over-estimated the market for such a truck in America.

The L200 was also noted for severe rust problems. One owner claimed the bottom of the car was almost entirely rusted over after just one year of ownership. That’s a scary thought for any auto owner!

Nissan Navara

89th Geneva International Motor Show Press Days
Robert Hradil/Getty Images
Robert Hradil/Getty Images

Let’s all be grateful the Nissan Navarra was never released in the United States. The pickup truck was released in Europe, New Zealand, Asia, and Australia, where it was discovered to be a mess of a pickup that should have never left the factory.

Rust was a major issue with the Navarra, which causes the underpinning of the truck to crack and eventually break into two. This, of course, is not safe for the driver or their passengers.

Chevy Corvair

23611757806_1ce8c90aad_k
JOHN LLOYD/Flickr
JOHN LLOYD/Flickr

One of the more unique looking cars on this list is the Chevy Corvair. It looks like Chevy took a toy truck and turned it into a pickup truck. In reality, it was created in response to the Volkswagon Type 2, a popular car at the time.

In 1961, Chevy put just under 3,000 Corvairs into production. The next year less than 400 were produced. Chevy was quick to admit their mistake and discontinued the vehicle.

Mazda Rotary

16661546497_559d86fec7_k
Alden Jewell/Flickr
Alden Jewell/Flickr

If you thought the Mazda B Series was the worst the company ever produced, you must not remember the Rotary. One of the most griped about vehicles in Mazda history, there was nothing good about the Rotary, not even the engine.

The name Rotary actually comes from the engine of the car, which was a Wankel-engine. This unique engine used a rotary design in combination with its internal combustion mechanics. It was, to be blunt, never intended to be put inside a pickup truck.

Land Rover Discovery

Land-Rover-Discovery--74607
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

Launched originally in 1989, the Land Rover Discovery is part of a mid-sized series coming from the Land Rover manufacturing company. Altogether there are five series of Discovery SUVs that have been separately sold and are scattered across the globe.

Though the Discovery initially had a lot of traction, sales of the Land Rover model have started to decrease in the past few years. Although it may look tough, it is expensive to maintain and generally unreliable.

Acura ZDX

Acura-ZDX--93879
Brian Ach/WireImage
Brian Ach/WireImage

Produced and marketed as a mid-size luxury crossover from the automotive company Acura, the ZDX blurs the lines between a sedan, SUV, and coupe which can explain the ZDX’s unique look.

This combination of inspiration caused audiences to formulate mixed ideas on what to expect from the ZDX and that confusion showed in the sales of the vehicle. Its production time ran from 2009-2013 and in that 4-year span just over 5,000 units were sold.

Isuzu VehiCROSS

vehicross-72054
Wikimedia Commons/johnnyapollo
Wikimedia Commons/johnnyapollo

The Isuzu VehiCROSS is a compact SUV made from Isuzu from 1997-2001. Designed for both on the road and off-road driving, the Vehicross had mixed reviews when it was introduced at the Tokyo International Auto Show.

In the Isuzu VehiCROSS’ four year span, Isuzu made minimal interior and body upgrades to the VehiCROSS to excite and retain their buyer base. As a result, it was eventually discontinued in 2001 due to a defect and a decrease in sales.

Toyota 4Runner

Toyota-4Runner--36849
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Around since 1983, the Toyota 4Runner is a compact SUV and mid-size SUV. Known as the Toyota Hilux in some parts of the world, the 4Runner was designed to be a family car.

Outside of some more advanced technological features in the newer models, the 4Runner isn’t incredibly unique nor does it offer anything special to buyers that they couldn’t find elsewhere. If you aren’t searching for an off-roading average-sized SUV, then there are plenty of other options to choose from.

Jeep Wrangler

jeep-bad-mileage-97961
Pinterest/Jeep Wrangler
Pinterest/Jeep Wrangler

Even the prospective buyers of Jeep Wranglers that are already aware of the vehicle’s poor gas mileage are shocked at just how bad it is, once they hit the road. Many even bring it to a mechanic, to see what’s wrong.

Owners of the model have taken to Wrangler Forum online to discuss gas mileage, with many of them wondering what’s wrong with their vehicle because it’s that bad. Those who answer blame their “heavy foot” on the poor performance while other realists explain, “I mean welcome to the world of Jeep man, tune-ups will help but everyone dreams of 15 mpg…”

Suzuki X-90

Suzuki-X-90--70933
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

The Suzuki X-90 is a subcompact SUV that looks and resembles a car and a pickup truck. Introduced as a concept car in 1993, the X-90 wasn’t launched and manufactured until 1995 where it ran for two years until its discontinuation in 1997.

In its two-year cycle, less than 6,000 models were sold and it was even named “One of The Worst Cars Ever Made” by Top Gear in 2013 for its lack of features and unappealing appearance.

Lincoln MKT

Lincoln-MKT--41834
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images

The 2nd largest SUV produced and marketed by Ford Motor Company, the Lincoln MKT is a full-size luxury crossover SUV sandwiched between the Lincoln MKX and Lincoln Navigator.

It ran production for a span of 9 years between 2010-2019 though it sold under 30,000 units in that time frame. Lincoln originally made it to compete with the Acura MDX, Audi Q7, and Mercedes-Benz R Class – though those models performed better than the MKT.

Infiniti QX56

Infiniti-QX56--86935 (1)
Courtesy of Infiniti/Getty Images
Courtesy of Infiniti/Getty Images

Essentially the same thing as a luxury Nissan Patrol, the Infiniti QX56 was a full-size luxury SUV that was designed as a performance competitor. Infiniti decided after 2013 that they would rename the QX56 to the QX80.

The names of the SUVs come from the engine displacement and as the name would go, the QX56 came with a standard 5.6 liter. Sadly, being a non-upgraded version of a non-luxury vehicle spelled doom for the Infiniti QX56.

Chrysler Aspen

Chrysler-Aspen-2-53118
Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images
Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images

A large Hemi powered 5-door SUV, the Chrysler Aspen was a luxury SUV that was originally based on the Dodge Durango. One of the first truck-based SUVs for the brand, Chrysler wanted to offer an entry to the SUV market to compete with other manufacturers, but the Aspen missed the mark.

Not well received by the public, who stayed away from dealers, the Aspen was discontinued in 2010 with only 30 units sold in its last year of production.

Pontiac Aztek

Pontiac-Aztek--51292
Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A mid-size crossover SUV, the Pontiac Aztek wasn’t a far cry from the Buick Rendezvous as they were both made under the manufacturer, General Motors, and resembled each other in body and style. The Aztek came standard with conventional features like a swing-open trunk door and a sliding cargo door for grocery shopping.

For a short time period, there was a sharp rise in the Aztek’s popularity because of it appearing in the show Breaking Bad. After a small boost in sales, its popularity faded and the line was discontinued.

Fiat 500X

Fiat-500X--96325
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

A subcompact SUV, the Fiat 500X is a complement to the Fiat 500, and while it is an SUV, the Fiat 500X still is limited in room and space like its smaller counterpart.

Closely related to the Jeep Renegade, the Fiat 500X and Renegade share the same manufacturers, though the Fiat 500X is mostly made in Italy. Buyers interested in the 500X in the US have 5 base trim levels to pick from, the Pop, Pop Star, Lounge, Cross, and Cross Plus.

Dodge Durango

Dodge-Durango-62367
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Based on the Dodge Dakota, the Dodge Durango is a mid-size SUV that was originally marketed as a large truck-based SUV that was capable of holding up to 7 passengers and over time, Dodge molded out the image to something softer and not nearly as rugged.

Dodge ended up having to recall and fix tens of thousands of Durangos due to a defect that may have caused the airbags not to deploy in a collision.

Jeep Renegade

Jeep-Renegade-98756
Stefano Guidi/Getty Images
Stefano Guidi/Getty Images

An off-road subcompact crossover SUV produced by Jeep, the Jeep Renegade, which was launched to the public in 2014, has seen a decrease in sales in the last few years.

Sold globally, the Renegade was meant as an option to buyers who wanted a smaller and more affordable entry-level Jeep with some of the same features and a similar appearance to the Jeep Wrangler. At the time it was designed to replace the Jeep Compass and Jeep Patriot.

GMC Acadia

GMC-Acadia-96796
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

A mid-size crossover that was manufactured and sold by General Motors, the GMC Acadia was designed off of the Chevrolet Traverse and Buick Enclave.

The GMC Acadia was GMC’s first front-wheel-drive passenger vehicle but outside of that, the Acadia didn’t have many other grand features to interest buyers. Going into its 2nd generation of Acadia’s, sales for the SUV have gone down in recent years with a 30,000 unit drop from 2017 to 2018.

Volvo XC90

Volvo-XC90--96429
EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images
EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images

The Volvo XC90 is a mid-size luxury SUV going into its second generation. It has been around since 2002 after being shown as a concept car in 2001.

Labeled as a practical SUV, if you plan on driving around your pets or children, then the Volvo could be a potential option. On the other hand, if you have a desire to drive around a clunky gas guzzler, then this SUV takes the cake.

Dodge Journey

Dodge-Journey--19906
Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images
Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images

Resembling a smaller minivan, the Dodge Journey is a mid-size crossover SUV manufactured under the FCA company. Though it was intended to be an entirely new model and different from the other vehicles on Dodge’s lineup, it isn’t much different from the Dodge Durango.

In 2014, Fiat decided to go a different route with its models and launched the Journey Crossroad. Sales for the Journey have fluctuated since 2007, but have been on a downward trend since.

Subaru B9 Tribeca

Subaru-B9-Tribeca--35884
STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images
STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

Named after the New York upscale neighborhood, the Subaru B9 Tribeca was a mid-size crossover SUV manufactured by Subaru from 2006 to 2007. Initially, the Subaru B9 Tribeca faced public scrutiny and criticism and Subaru decided because of the backlash to change the B9’s name to simply the Subaru Tribeca.

If that wasn’t bad enough, Subaru discontinued making the Tribeca in 2015 after slowed sales; in its 10-year production run, less than 84,000 units were sold.

Mercedes-Benz GLA

Mercedes-Benz-GLA--13592
Uli Deck/picture alliance via Getty Images
Uli Deck/picture alliance via Getty Images

Considered a sports car SUV, the Mercedes-Benz GLA was initially designed to compete with the BMW X1 and the Audi Q3. The car’s body is based on a Nissan QX30 and outside of some label changes, the SUVs are almost identical to one another.

To market the GLA, Mercedes-Benz partnered with Nintendo and created an ad that showed Mario driving one of the GLAs on television. While the marketing was creative, sales for the GLA models have been stagnant for the past few years without much increase or improvement.

Lexus LX570

Lexus-LX570-28399
STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images
STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

A full-size luxury SUV based on the Toyota Land Cruiser SUV, the Lexus LX570 is basically an exact replica of the Land Cruiser with a Lexus logo on the front of it.

The LX in the name of the car stands for “Luxury Crossover” and while there are a few minor tweaks to the LX line, there aren’t any glaring features that help it stand out against other luxury SUVs in its class. Sales for the Lexus LX570 have fluctuated since 2007 but the automaker has never sold more than 8,000 units in one year.

Lamborghini LM002

Lamborghini-LM002-83009
Manfred Segerer/ullstein bild via Getty Images
Manfred Segerer/ullstein bild via Getty Images

A 4-door sport SUV, the Lamborghini LM002 was the first SUV pickup designed by the luxury sports car brand. Based on its looks and usability, it’s clear that they took some risks with the design and build of the LM002.

Since 1986 when the Lamborghini LM002 was first produced, only 328 have been made. Dubbed the “Rambo Lambo,” this SUV proves that not all luxury sport SUVs are made equal and not all are wanted or needed.

Hyundai Santa Fe

Hyundai-Santa-Fe-14542
Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images
Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images

The first SUV released by the manufacturer Hyundai, the Santa Fe is a mid-size crossover SUV that has been in production since 2000. Since then, the Santa Fe has gone through four generations and is currently on its 4th generation which is expected to run from 2018-2024.

With a lack of options for buyers and little changes from generation to generation as well as long-time spans before any upgrades are made, Santa Fe sales have lessened over the years.

Chevrolet Trailblazer

Chevrolet-Trailblazer--80456
Ramesh Pathania/Mint via Getty Images
Ramesh Pathania/Mint via Getty Images

Eventually replaced by the Chevrolet Traverse in 2009, the Chevrolet Trailblazer used to be the face of mid-size SUVs for the Chevrolet car brand from 2001-2008. While production in the U.S. ended, it is still being produced in other parts of the world including some parts of Asia and Brazil.

The Chevrolet Trailblazer ranked low in rollover safety after being tested thoroughly and annual sales have dropped dramatically since 2001 when it was first launched.