These Vintage And Antique Cars Sold For Millions At Auction

Automotive enthusiasts have created some amazing automobiles in the last century, breaking the boundaries of what’s possible in speed, design, and engineering. Things have gone so far that some boxes on four wheels fetch prices in the millions on various auctions around the world. But, hey, as long as there are enthusiasts ready to pay, there will be amazing automobiles to buy. We compiled a list of the most expensive vintage and antique cars in history.

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO – $48.41 Million

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

The 250 GTO is arguably the best Ferrari ever made, and probably the most beautiful one, too. Some say that it’s even the most important car in history. The 250 GTO is almost mythical today, with only 36 examples built and prices that make it out of reach for most people.

When Ferrari first launched the supercar, it caught the world by storm. It featured a screaming V12 engine producing 296 HP at 7,500 rpm, propelling the car to 280 km/h (174 mph), an outstanding achievement for the era. The 250 GTO was also lightweight, had a very balanced chassis, and a very aerodynamic body. Even today, drivers say it provides the ultimate driving experience.

1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 – $29,6 Million

1954 Mercedes-Benz W196
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

The Mercedes-Benz W196 provides a sneak peek into the history of Formula 1, showing a lightweight construction, streamlined body, and a mightily powerful 2.5-liter inline-8 engine (very common at the time) producing 256 HP.

The W196 was extremely aero-efficient, having no spoilers on the body, like every other F1 car of that era. The result was a top speed of over 300 km/h (186 mph), a staggering number in the 50s’. With the help of certain Juan Manuel Fangio, the W196 proved to be one of the most formidable F1 cars in history, winning the 1954 German and Swiss Grand Prix races.

1956 Ferrari 290 MM – $28.05 Million

1956 Ferrari 290 MM
Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images
Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The Ferrari 290 MM is another amazing racing car from the 50s, finishing on the podium at the Mille Miglia and 1000 KM of Buenos Aires races. The car is also significant because Stirling Moss, one of the greatest racing drivers of all time, drove it to victory at the Nassau Trophy.

Moreover, the 290 MM was one of the most powerful cars of the era, packing a 3.5-liter V12 engine producing 320 HP with the help of three Weber twin-choke 46 DCF3 carburetors. It also sounded like every racing car engine should, and propelled the vehicle to 280 km/h (174 mph). Today, the most pristine example fetched a price of $28.05 million at an RM Sotheby’s auction.

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider – $27.5 Million

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider
Photo by Marcusmv3 – Wikimedia Commons
Photo by Marcusmv3 – Wikimedia Commons

The Ferrari 275 GTB succeeded the 250 GTO as Ferrari’s high-end offering. It packed a brand-new 3.3-liter V12 with quad camshafts, resulting in 320 HP at 7,700 rpm. This particular N.A.R.T. Spider was one of the fastest open-top vehicles of the era, topping at 255 km/h (159 mph). It could also sprint to 60mph in only 5.5 seconds, and had a slick-shifting 5-speed manual.

Interestingly, the N.A.R.T. Spider that sold for $27.5 million at an RM Sotheby’s auction is only one of ten examples ever made, making it one of the rarest vehicles in the world. According to many, the current owner of the 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider is Aston Martin F1 owner, Lawrence Stroll.

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale – $26.4 Million

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

If you are not a fan of Spider open-top designs, then maybe the 275 GTB/C Speciale might interest you? It’s the coupe version of the N.A.R.T. Spider, looking perhaps even better in this form.

Moreover, the Tipo 563 chassis it was built on was extremely lightweight, thanks to the aluminum construction. Ferrari also employed disc brakes at all four wheels, and an independent suspension all around. The package was so nicely-balanced that the 275 GTB/C is still the highest-ranked front-engine car in Le Mans history, finishing third overall on the 1965 edition. Recently, a pristine example fetched a price of $26.4 million at an RM Sotheby’s auction.

1956 Aston Martin DBR1 – $22.55 Million

1956 Aston Martin DBR1
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

The Aston Martin DBR1 looks like a classic British sports car of the 50s, with swooping lines, large fenders, and a large grille at the front. But its significance has more to do with the racing success, especially the racing drivers that pushed it to the max. Notable names include Carroll Shelby, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham, and Roy Salvadori.

The DBR1 followed the British lightweight mantra, weighing only 1,765 lb (801 kg). Hence, the relatively small 2.5-liter (later 3.0-liter) inline-6 didn’t have a hard time pushing it to dizzying speeds. As a result, the DBR1 won the 1000km of Nürburgring twice, in 1958 and 1959.

1935 Duesenberg SSJ – $22 Million

1935 Duesenberg SSJ
Photo by Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Photo by Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Most young readers probably don’t know about Duesenberg, but the company was by far the most influential in the automotive industry’s beginnings. The brand even produced the USA’s first supercar, named the SSJ, which competed favorably with European competitors. Namely, the open-top beast packed a mammoth 420 CID (6.9-liter) inline-8 engine, which produced staggering 400 HP thanks to an additional supercharger.

The Duesenberg SSJ was an amazingly quick car for the era, making the 0-60mph sprint in only 7.8 seconds and achieving a top speed of 150 mph (241 km/h), despite the terrible aerodynamics. It’s no coincidence, then, that a certain Gary Cooper had it in his collection.

1955 Jaguar D-Type – $21.78 Million

1955 Jaguar D-Type
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

The Jaguar D-Type is arguably one of the most streamlined and most beautiful vintage racers. Even more importantly, though, it won the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans with Ecurie Ecosse. The D-Type is a very rare sight – there is essentially one vehicle left in the original form.

Behind the sports car’s success is a 3.4-liter DOHC inline-6 engine, good for 250 HP thanks to the three Weber 45 DCO3 carburetors. Moreover, the D-Type features an independent rear suspension and an aerodynamic body, extracting the most out of the engine. Thanks to its winning pedigree and rarity, the Jaguar D-Type fetched $21.78 million at an RM Sotheby’s auction.

1963 Aston Martin DP215 Grand Touring Competition Prototype – $21.46 Million

1963 Aston Martin DP215
Photo by Bernard Cahier/Getty Images
Photo by Bernard Cahier/Getty Images

The Aston Martin DP215 Grand Touring Competition Prototype is the successor to the DBR1. This time, the British firm decided to use a coupe body, giving the car much better aerodynamics. The shape is so sleek, in fact, that the DP215 clocked 198.6 mph (320 km/h) on the Mulsanne Straight, an outstanding number for the era.

Under the bonnet, the DP215 features a 4.0-liter inline-6 engine with three Weber 50 DCO carburetors, producing 327 HP. The supercar also features a 5-speed manual transmission from David Brown and a double-wishbone rear suspension. Meanwhile, the body of the DP215 was made of Hiduminium, an ultra-high-strength aluminum alloy.

1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider – $19.8 Million

1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider
Photo by Rex Gray / Wikimedia Commons
Photo by Rex Gray / Wikimedia Commons

With its swooping lines, ultra-long hood, and graceful appearance, the Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful cars ever made. The exquisite Italian convertible is a very rare sight today, but it was also rare when it launched – Alfa Romeo has built only 12 examples.

Although not a high-performance car, the 8C 2900B Lungo Spider still offered good performance for the era – under the long bonnet lies a dual-supercharged 2.9-liter inline-8 engine producing 180 HP. The car also featured an independent front suspension and hydraulic friction dampers.

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione – $17.99 Million

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione
Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

So we get back to another Ferrari, this time the elegant-looking 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione from 1959. Like most cars from the brand of that era, the 250 GT was primarily built for the race track, but it was also a good road car.

Notably, the super-roadster featured a 3.0-liter V12 under the bonnet, paired with three Weber 40 DLC6 carburetors, producing 275 HP at 7,000 rpm. Perhaps even more important for an open-top car, it is one of the best-sounding engines of that era. A rare sight today, the 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione’s price continues to rise, so don’t be shocked if you see a sample selling for more than $17.99 million soon.

1970 Porsche 917K – $14.08 Million

GettyImages-618410624
Photo by Allan Hamilton/ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Photo by Allan Hamilton/ Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

The Porsche 917K is easily the most advanced racecar of its era, packing some serious power and advanced aerodynamics. As a result, it gave Porsche its first two wins at the 24h Le Mans in 1970 and 1971, which wasn’t a surprise given the level of performance it offered.

The numbers of the 917K are music to car enthusiast’s ears even today. Notably, the car packed a flat-12 (boxer) air-cooled engine of 5.0-liter capacity, producing 630 HP at fairly high 8,300 rpm. Thanks to the ultra-lightweight chassis, the engine propelled the racecar to 62mph (100 km/h) in only 2.3 seconds and up to 362 km/h (225 mph).

1962 Shelby 260 Cobra CSX 2000 – $13.75 Million

1962 Shelby 260 Cobra CSX 2000
Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Photo by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Shelby 260 Cobra CSX 2000 is one of the most expensive American cars ever, exceeded only by the Duesenberg SSJ. However, as time goes by, these cars might fetch even higher prices at auctions, since they are very rare and a blast to drive.

Unlike European supercars, the 260 Cobra has a 4.26-liter (250 cu. in.) V8 engine under the hood, producing 260 HP. The number might not seem high, but the 260 Cobra CSX 2000 is a very small and lightweight car. Hence, it could accelerate to 60mph in only 4.2 seconds, up to 153mph (247 km/h).

1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster – $11.77 Million

1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster
Photo by Jack Snell via Flickr
Photo by Jack Snell via Flickr

Mercedes-Benz was without question the most advanced carmaker in the first half of the 20th century. The German brand was very successful in the racecar world, but it also had stunning luxury offerings. One such vehicle is the 540K Special Roadster, which was one of the finest convertibles of its era.

The extra-long roadster had a 5.4-liter inline-8 engine under the extended bonnet, producing 180 HP and 318 lb-ft (431 Nm) of torque. Hence, it was more of a relaxed cruiser, sprinting to 60mph in 16.4 seconds, although it had a respectable top speed of 120 mph (193 km/h). Inside, the 540K Special Roadster features ultra-classy saddle leather, making the drive even more sumptuous.

1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Torpedo Roadster – $8.25 Million

1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Torpedo Roadster
Photo by Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Photo by Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Before the 540K Special Roadster, Mercedes-Benz offered the 680S Torpedo Roadster. An exquisite example of early luxury, the 680S featured the most advanced technology and finest design of the era. That’s because the car had German mechanics, but it was penned by French designer Jaques Saoutchik.

In 1928, few cars were quicker than the 680S Torpedo Roadster, and none was better engineered. Under the hood, the car featured a supercharged 6.8-liter inline-6 engine producing 180 HP, enough for leisurely acceleration and law-breaking top speed. Meanwhile, the 680S Torpedo’s interior was hand-crafted with high-quality materials and to outstanding fit and finish.

1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta – $7.6 Million

1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta
Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images
Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images

The LWB California Spider Competizione is a sweet-looking convertible, but the coupe version of the 250 GT SWB, called the Berlinetta, is no slouch, either. Actually, many prefer the more aggressive appearance of the coupe. Notably, in this generation, Ferrari replaced the previous model’s swooping lines with a more muscular appearance, further exaggerating the outstanding performance.

Under the bonnet, Ferrari’s 1963 supercar featured a 3.0-liter V12 engineering marvel, producing 280 HP. Thanks to the low weight of only 2110 lbs (957 kg), the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta accelerates to 60mph in only 4.5 seconds. The top speed sits at 150mph (241 km/h), an excellent number for the era.

1965 Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupe CSX 260 – $7.25 Million

1965 Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupe CSX 260
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

Back in the 60s, Shelby was the only American company competing with European racecars and many times emerging as the winner. The car that was instrumental in Shelby’s success was the 1965 Daytona Cobra Coupe CSX 260. A super-lightweight hot-rod, the supercar had exhilarating straight-line performance, but it was also competent in the corners.

As a result, the Daytona Coupe won eight of eleven races in the FIA GT class in 1965, beating non-other than Ferrari in the process. Moreover, Shelby won the World Manufacturers Championship. Shelby has built only six purposeful racecars, making them extremely rare today. It’s no coincidence, then, that they fetch such high prices at auctions.

1955 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spider – $5.17 Million

1955 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spider
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

In an era when supercars featured long bodies and large-displacement engines, Maserati went in the opposite direction. Despite its diminutive size and a relatively small 2.0-liter inline-6, the A6GCS/53 Spider was one of the finest sports cars of the era. Notably, Maserati extracted 170 HP at 7,300 rpm using three Weber 40 DCO3 carburetors, which is still an amazing feat.

The A6GCS/53 is the racecar version, targeting the Mile Miglia, where it won, and the Targa Florio, where it finished second. Maserati has built only 15 samples of the racing version, but it has built an additional 60 of the road-going A6GCS/54.

1963 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster – $5 Million

1963 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images

The Mercedes-Benz 300SL is famous for its Gullwing doors, a design that was copied by many supercar manufacturers, even today. However, it’s the roadster version of the car, notably without the Gullwing doors, that secured the highest price at an RM Sotheby’s auction.

The car that sold at that auction is a refreshed model with an advanced aluminum engine block and disc brakes, of which Mercedes-Benz has built only 210 samples. Under the bonnet, the 300SL Roadster features a 3.0-liter inline-6 engine producing 240 HP, while power goes to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual.

1979 Porsche 935: $4,84 Million

1979 Porsche 935
Photo by Zach James Todd/Future Publishing via Getty Images
Photo by Zach James Todd/Future Publishing via Getty Images

The Porsche 935 is one of the most dominant racing cars of all time, having won 123 races of the 370 it entered. Notable wins include 1979 24h Le Mans, 1000 km of Nürburgring, 24h Daytona, and 12h Sebring.

The biggest reason behind the 935’s dominance was the 3.3-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engine, which produced 845 HP, an outstanding number for an endurance racer. Moreover, the 935 with the aerodynamic “Moby Dick” guise could achieve 367 km/h on the Mulsanne straight. Thanks to its amazing achievements, the Porsche 935’s price continues to rise, with some models nearing the $5 million mark at auctions.

1966 Batmobile 1 – $4.62 Million

1966 Batmobile 1
Photo by Joel Lerner/Xinhua via Getty
Photo by Joel Lerner/Xinhua via Getty

The Batmobile 1 is a car that evokes many memories, especially among the elderly generation. We guess it also makes you sing “Batman, Batman, Batman” inside your head while looking at it. Undoubtedly, the superhero/vigilante car is apart of popular culture, and perhaps as famous as Batman himself.

Now, sure, the Batmobile 1 wasn’t produced for the general public, but you can still buy one today, provided you have around $5 million in your bank account. Interestingly, the Batmobile 1 is based on the Lincoln Futura concept, a convertible that also had an eye-catching design.

1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Convertible Coupe – $4.51 Million

1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Convertible Coupe
Photo by National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
Photo by National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

The Duesenberg SJ was the more civilized version of the SSJ supercar, featuring a detuned variant of the supercharged 420 CID (6.9-liter) inline-8 engine. However, with 320 HP under the bonnet, the SJ was still a very powerful car for the era, capable of 140 mph (225 km/h) and a 0-60mph sprint of only 8 seconds.

If these numbers don’t capture your imagination, you should know that most sports cars from that era couldn’t even reach 100mph. And the most phenomenal thing is that the Duesenberg SJ could achieve those speeds while providing its passengers with absolute comfort.

1955 Porsche 550 Spyder – $4.46 Million

1955 Porsche 550 Spyder
Photo by Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Photo by Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If you are measuring the Porsche 550 Spyder only by the numbers, the car won’t look particularly interesting. After all, it features a 1.5-liter flat-four cylinder engine, good for 110 HP. However, the 550 Spyder also weighs only 1,400 pounds (635 kg), and as a result, it could go from 0-60mph in seven seconds and reach a top speed of 140 mph (225 km/h).

The roadster is also famous for being the car in which James Dean tragically died when driving to a race meeting. The accident wasn’t his fault, but nonetheless, his passing still resonates in the automotive world to this day.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88 2-Door – $3.85 Million

1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88 2-Door
Source: Barrett-Jackson
Source: Barrett-Jackson

The L88 was a special version of the 1967 Corvette, packing a 7.0-liter V8 engine under the hood, good for 430 HP. However, it is widely considered that the L88 makes much more than that, closer to 560 HP, making it one of the most powerful supercars of its era.

The Corvette L88 is also among the most beautiful supercars ever made, with a rear that still resonates to this day. Chevy made only 20 samples of the L88, making it the most sought-after Corvette’s, ever. As a result, a red model, sampled on the picture above, reached $3.85 million at a Barrett-Jackson auction.

1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix – $3.74 Million

1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix
Photo by John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images

Today, Bugatti is known for the Veyron and Chiron, two staggeringly powerful hypercars with massive 8.0-liter quad-turbocharged W16 engines. However, the brand wasn’t always like that – in the 1930s, it was more about lightweight design and agile handling, as evident in the 1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix. Besides, compared to other sports cars of the era, it was much smaller.

Under the short bonnet, the diminutive sports car featured a 2.3-liter supercharged inline-8, good for 160 HP. With this setup, the Type 51 managed to win the French Grand Prix, although overall it wasn’t as successful as its main competitors.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO – $3.36 Million

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO
Photo by National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images
Photo by National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

Although it only finished as a road-going supercar, the Ferrari 288 GTO was primarily intended as a homologation special for the Group B rally. However, just as Ferrari was to enter the championship, FIA has shut down the program due to safety reasons.

Fortunately, Ferrari brought everything it learned on the track to the production version. The 288 GTO not only looks like a modern supercar, but it also drives like one. Moreover, thanks to the 400 HP 2.9-liter turbocharged V8 in the middle, it was the first car to break the 300 km/h barrier. Specifically, it had a top speed of 304 km/h (189 mph). Expect the price to go up in the coming decades.

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Berlinetta – $3.19 Million

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Berlinetta
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo by Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

Ferrari’s dominance in racing was in full swing in the 50s, with cars like the Ferrari 212 Export Berlinetta. Notably, the streamlined supercar has won some of the most competitive races of the era, including 10 Hours of Messina, Giro di Sicilia, and Tour de France automobile.

The 212 Export Berlinetta featured a 2.7-liter Colombo V12 engine, producing around 165 HP. Although not as powerful as other Ferrari’s, the 212 weighed only 1,874 lb (850 kg) and was very agile in the corners. Moreover, the car featured a 5-speed manual transmission, very rare in that era.

1931 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Supercharged Gran Sport Spider – $3.08 Million

1931 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Supercharged Gran Sport Spider
Photo by Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Photo by Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

Before Ferrari even started entering racing competitions, it was Alfa Romeo that dominated the scene. Curiously, in its early days, it was Enzo Ferrari that was team principal at Alfa Romeo, which is probably the biggest reason why the team was so successful.

Regardless, one of the mightiest Alfa’s of the era was the 6C 1750 Supercharged Gran Sport Spider, a lightweight sports car with a small, yet mighty engine. Notably, the 1.75-liter unit produced 85 HP, which was an excellent number for the era, along with the low weight of only 2028 lb (920 kg). According to the lucky few that drove it, the 6C offers an unparalleled driving experience.

1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante – $2.81 Million

1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images

The Bugatti Type 57C Atalante is a regular on the lists of the most beautiful cars ever made, unsurprisingly. The two-tone body with swooping lines and gorgeous bulges make it stand out from other cars of that era. The Type 57C Atalante was also very influential in designing the Veyron and Chiron more than 60 years later, which also feature a two-tone paint.

The car wasn’t all about the looks, though. Thanks to the 3.3-liter inline-8 engine, producing 175 HP, an outstanding number for the era. Today, it’s one of the most sought-after collectible pieces from Bugatti.

1958 BMW 507 Series II – $2.75 Million

1958 BMW 507 Series II
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images
Photo by John Keeble/Getty Images

When BMW launched the 507 roadster, it had big expectations from the model, expecting sales of a few thousand units every year. However, although undoubtedly good looking, the 507 proved very expensive. Besides, the BMW name didn’t have the cachet in the 50s that it has today. As a result, the Bavarian giant made only 252 cars.

Again, the fact that the roadster didn’t sell wasn’t because it was not good. With a 150 HP 3.2-liter V8 under the bonnet, the BMW 507 was a very quick and fun-to-drive sports car. Notably, Elvis Presley also John Surtees owned this beautiful roadster.

1954 Porsche 718 RS 61 Spyder – $2.75 Million

1954 Porsche 718 RS 61 Spyder
Photo by Bernard Cahier/Getty Images
Photo by Bernard Cahier/Getty Images

If you ever asked yourself why Porsche uses the “718” designation for the latest Boxster and Cayman, here is your answer. The 718 RS 61 Spyder was a very successful racing car of the 50s, largely thanks to the outstandingly lightweight construction – it weighed only 1,256 lb (570 kg).

Like in the 550 Spyder, the centrally-located engine was a small 1.6-liter flat-four, although this time it produced 150 HP. As a result, the 718 RS 61 Spyder was a very quick little sports car, winning the European Climb Championship in 1961.

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C – $2.64 Million

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C-1171696082
Photo by Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Photo by Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The 275 GTB/6C coupe is the last Ferrari on this list, we promise. This particular model is a mild redesign of the 275’s we already mentioned, with a longer nose upfront. Moreover, the body of the 275 GTB/6C was made from aluminum, making it even lighter, tipping the scales at 1,112 kg (2,452 lb), compared to 1,300 kg (2,866 lb) of the steel model.

As a result, the 305 HP 3.3-liter Colombo V12 engine could propel the supercar to 60mph in under 6 seconds and onto a top speed of 160 mph (258 km/h). The 275 GTB was also the first car with an independent suspension in the rear, making it much more stable at higher speeds.

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe – $2.09 Million

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe
Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images
Photo by Jeff Gritchen/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images

After featuring the unquestionably excellent Roadster version, it’s time for the more popular Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe. Arguably the first modern supercar, the Gullwing, completely changed the industry when it launched in 1954.

From its “gullwing” doors to the mechanical direct fuel-injection engine, the 300SL was a technological marvel, unsurpassed for the years to come. Besides, it could do 160 mph, a number that was only reserved for racecars back then. With this particular car, Mercedes-Benz showed its engineering supremacy in the automotive world, an advantage that, debatably, holds even today.

1967 Ford GT40 Mk IV – $1.93M

1967 Ford GT40 Mk IV
Photo by Klemantaski Collection/Getty Images
Photo by Klemantaski Collection/Getty Images

Ferrari might be the biggest name in racing history, but for a short period, the 1967 Ford GT40 Mk IV ran circles around the Italians. Perhaps the most-beloved American racecar, ever, the GT40 was developed by Carroll Shelby himself just to beat Ferrar at Le Mans.

The Ford succeeded with flying colors. It won the 24h Le Mans four years in a row: 1966, 1967, 1968, and 1969. The first two years, Ford used a massive 7.0-liter V8 but has later moved to a 4.9-liter V8. Regardless of the engine, the power of the GT40 was in its aerodynamic design and beautifully-balanced chassis.

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV – $2.42 Million

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV
Photo by Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Photo by Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

In the eyes of many, the Lamborghini Miura is the first real mid-engined supercar. It is also one of the most beautiful cars ever made, with elegant, yet sporty lines all around. The best version of the Miura is arguably the P400 SV, packing a 3.9-liter V12 producing healthy 415 HP.

The Miura wasn’t particularly fast to 60mph, achieving the sprint in around 6.5 seconds. However, it also achieved a top speed of 186mph (300 km/h), making it one of the fastest supercars of its era. Mint examples of the Lamborghini Miura continue to fetch higher prices at auctions, so don’t be surprised to see it climb up the ladder.

1974 Lamborghini Countach – $1.87 Million

1974 Lamborghini Countach
Photo by Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Photo by Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

Miura’s successor, the Countach, literally shattered the supercar world when it launched in 1974. Behind the angular and futuristic design was Bertone’s Marcello Gandini, who also designed the Miura. This time, though, Marcelo was much braver, and of course, we are happy about it.

The Countach was so influential at the time that almost every teenager had a poster of the supercar in the bedroom. Much like the predecessor, the Countach featured a 3.9-liter V12 engine in the middle, although the capacity later rose to 4.75-liters (LP500S), and 5.2-liters (5000 QV, 25th Anniversary). As a result, the Countach was one of the fastest supercars of the era, with the latest version topping out at 183mph (295 km/h), despite the large wing in the back.

1967 Toyota 2000 GT – $1.2 Million

1967 Toyota 2000 GT
Photo by Bob D’Olivo/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images
Photo by Bob D’Olivo/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images

The Toyota 2000 GT was Japan’s first supercar, significant for breaking the speed record for a sub-2.0-liter car. Under the beautifully-sculpted bonnet, the 2000 GT featured a 2.0-liter inline-6 engine developed from Yamaha, good for 150 HP. Although not very powerful, the 2000 GT could still reach 135mph (217 km/h).

More importantly, auto magazines of the era praised the Toyota 2000 GT for the sweet handling and fun driving experience. Toyota has built only 337 models and sold each one of them. Notably, one 2000 GT was converted to a roadster convertible and featured in the James Bond “You Only Live Twice” movie.

1970 Nissan 240Z Z432R – $805,000

1970 Nissan 240Z Z432R
Source: BH Auction
Source: BH Auction

The “Z” family of Nissan’s sports cars is one of the most famous in automotive history, with a brand-new 400Z arriving this year. However, the first-gen 240Z is arguably the most popular among Japanese-car lovers. The coupe features a very attractive design, especially in JDM trim with the mirrors on the fenders.

The most desirable and most powerful 240Z is the Z432R, which employs the 158 HP inline-6 engine from the Skyline GT-R. Nissan has built only 420 examples as homologation specials, although today no more than 50 models grace the roads. Watch for this car in the future, as prices continue to go up.

The 1967 Shelby Cobra 427 Super Snake Was One Of The Most Popular Cobras Ever Made

The 1967 Shelby Cobra 427 Super Snake Was One Of The Most Popular Cobras Ever Made
sacrifade/Reddit
sacrifade/Reddit

If nothing else, this car certainly looks impressive. The Shelby Cobra Super Snake was essentially a race car that was made to drive on regular American streets. It still remains one of the most popular cars that Cobra ever made.

These cars came equipped with a V8 Shelby engine, plus a pair of Paxton superchargers, doubling its output from 427 to 800 horsepower. This model is one of the rarest Shelbys ever built, and one of the most powerful.

The 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Came With Options

The 1967 Chevrolet Camaro
American Muscle Car Museum
American Muscle Car Museum

The 1967 Chevrolet Camaro followed Chevy’s first pony car (introduced in 1966) into the market. The Camaro quickly became a hit, and pretty soon after that, GM was offered to qualify the Camaro for the sports car Club of America’s TransAm racing series.

They just had to do some minor adjustments to the engine, but they were more than happy to make those specialized adjustments. If you were buying this car straight from the showroom, you could choose to buy it as a two-door or two-plus-two seat, with the choice of either a straight-6 or V8 engine.

The 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Was Just Too Fast

The 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Was Just Too Fast
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

When you hear about racecars, you don’t often hear about them being too fast, but interestingly, that was the case with the ’69 Dodge Charger Daytona. This car became the first car to break the 200MPH mark in NASCAR history. It gained popularity on the track, and eventually, it was marketed to the general public, but this car was only sold for one year.

The reason is because of its successor, the 1970 Plymouth Superbird, was even more notorious. In reality, the Superbird was just Daytona Charger in a not so clever disguise. The cars were so fast that NASCAR eventually banned them from competition.

The 1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible Featured Rear Hinged Doors

The 1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible Featured Rear Hinged Doors
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If you’ve ever been in a ’61 Lincoln Continental Convertible, you’ve probably noticed its trademark suicide doors and convertible top. There aren’t many cars like this one on the market.

Those rear-hinged seats were actually designed as such to solve a problem. While the engineers were examining the back seats, they consistently kicked the rear doors. To solve this, they would hinge the doors from the rear, elevating the Continental to icon status. Smart move.

The 1963 Buick Electra 225 Came With Signature “Ventiports”

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The 1962 version of the Buick Electra was nothing like its predecessor. The car received a major makeover that year. The only thing that stayed the same was the company’s signature “ventiports.” Under the hood, Buick equipped the car with a 401 cubic-inch V8 that provided a major power upgrade.

You could get the Electra in several body styles including convertible, station wagon, sedan, and coupe. In 1991, after three decades on the market, the Electra would be replaced by the Buick Park Avenue.

The 1969 Ford Mustang 428 Cobra Jet Redefined Mustang

The 1969 Ford Mustang 428 Cobra Jet Redefined Mustang
GT Motor Cars, LLC
GT Motor Cars, LLC

In 1969, Ford introduced a new, more powerful version of the Mustang; the Mustang Cobra Jet. It’s regarded as the model that took the fight to the big-block Camaros and Firebirds of the time. With a 428-cid V8 engine, it featured larger valve heads than the standard Mustang.

The Mustang Cobra Jet was capable of reaching 410 horsepower. This figure was notable since it brought in a new wave of interest for the Ford Mustang. With the release of the 428 Cobra Jet, the tables finally turned for the company.

The 1966 Ford Thunderbird Convertible Was One Of The First Personal Luxury Cars

The 1966 Ford Thunderbird Convertible Was One Of The First Personal Luxury Cars
Pinterest/trhine67
Pinterest/trhine67

Hardcore Chevy enthusiasts typically prefer two model years of the Chevelle, 1967 and 1970 (pictured). The car got a revamped look in 1967, with its sales brochure boasting: “What you’ll see inside will probably bring on a severe compulsion to go driving.”

The year a new dual master cylinder brake system, with front disc brakes available on all models. 14″ wheels and a redesigned rear completed the look. The epitome of a muscle car, the 1967 Chevelle is the kind of car that will stop traffic with its good looks.

The 1960 Ferrari 250 PF Cabriolet Was Perfect For Road Trips

1960
RM Sotheby’s
RM Sotheby’s

With the release of the Ferarri 250 PF Cabriolet in 1960, the luxury automaker continued its mission to offer something special to consumers that they couldn’t buy from another brand.

It served as the perfect car for touring and emerged as a car for those who wanted to go on a road trip. The 250 series cars are characterized by their use of 3.0 liters with a Colombo V12 engine, designed by Gioacchino Colombo. When the car was discontinued, the 275 and 330 series replaced it.

The 1960 Chrysler 300F Convertible Had Swivel Seats

The 1960 Chrysler 300F Convertible Had Swivel Seats
Barrett-Jackson Auction Company
Barrett-Jackson Auction Company

The ’60 300F was perhaps the most dynamic iteration of Chrysler’s “Letter Series.” As the first of the 300 models to use unibody construction, it was both lighter and more rigid than its predecessors. Additionally, the car also featured a four-place seating with a full-length center console, which contained the switches for the power window.

What’s more interesting is that the front seats swiveled outwards when the doors were opened to make it easier to get in and out.

The 1965 GT K-code Fastback Had A High-Performance Engine

The 1965 GT K-code Fastback Had A High Performance Engine
CJ Pony Parts
CJ Pony Parts

This was the car everyone would want to have in their garage. It came with a high-performance engine that left other autos in the dust, so it was no surprise why people wanted this car.

Interestingly enough, Ford did a deal for buyers to remove nine months off the warranty. The company must have known that whoever got behind the wheel of this car was going to drive fast and hard for good measure. On the Mustang order form, the K-code was a $276 option package.

The 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray Coupe Was A Real Status Symbol

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RM Sotheby’s
RM Sotheby’s

The ’63 Sting Ray was the first production Corvette coupe ever offered. The split rear window ensures its instant icon status as it marked the first time hideaway headlights were applied to the Corvette.

The Sting Ray, with its acceleration horsepower, acted like a lighter version of a Corvette. Over 20,000 unites were built for the 1963, which doubled how many were produced for the year prior. The second generation of the Chevy Corvette sports car was produced for the 1963-1967 model years.

The 1968 BMW 2002 Was The First In A Long Line Of Compact Sedans

The 1968 BMW 2002 Was The First In A Long Line Of Compact Sedans
BMWGalleryOfNorwood / Facebook
BMWGalleryOfNorwood / Facebook

The 1968 BMW 2002 was the first compact sporting sedan in BMW’s lineup. It paved the way for the contemporary BMW 3 and 4 Series cars. In fact, all two-door coupe’s in BMW’s repertoire bring up old memories of this pioneering model.

Since the car was introduced in 1962, it wasn’t until 1966 that BMW finally applied the formula to a two-door coupe, with the result being the two-door sedan becoming the basis of the sporting 02 Series.

The 1965 Shelby GT350 Looked Like A Race Car

The 1965 Shelby GT350 Looked Like A Race Car
Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

This car looks like something straight out of a Herbie movie. It may not be a love bug, but it definitely looks like it was well-loved in its day. All 1965 GT350’s were painted Wimbledon White with Guardsman Blue rocker stripes.

These cars came equipped with a four-speed Borg-Warner T10 manual. The exhaust system in the 65 GT350 was a side-exit dual exhaust with glass pack mufflers. It’s rare to find a fully equipped GT350 on the road today.

The 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado Had Easy To Enter Passenger Doors

The 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado Had Easy To Enter Passenger Doors
Bringatrailer
Bringatrailer

The personal luxury car was manufactured from 1966 to 1992 over four generations. To fit into the tight space, Oldsmobile adopted torsion bars for the front suspension. As with many coupes, the Toronado featured elongated doors to allow easier access for passengers entering the rear seats.

The Toronado sold reasonably well at introduction, with 40,963 produced for 1966. Some television commercials featured former NASA Project Mercury public affairs officer John “Shorty” Powers, Oldsmobile’s commercial spokesperson of the era.

The 1964 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage Coupe Appeared In Goldfinger

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RM Sotheby’s
RM Sotheby’s

One of the most popular James Bond cars ever made, the 1964 DB5 Vantage Coupe is also one of our favorites on this list. Released in 1963, it was a beautiful reimagining of the DB4 Series 5.

The car’s first spy mission came in Goldfinger. The movie studio, along with the automaker, put two cars on display at the New York World’s Fair to help promote the film. The tactic worked, and the movie went on to become one of the highest-grossing films in the franchise.

The 1961 Jaguar E-Type Could Go 50 Miles Per Hour

The 1961 Jaguar E-Type Could Go 50 Miles Per Hour
Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images
Michael Cole/Corbis via Getty Images

Enzo Ferrari proclaimed this to be the most beautiful car ever made. This car is so special, that it’s one of only six vehicle models on display at the New York City Museum of Modern Art.

Production on this particular car lasted as long as 14 years, a span which lasted from 1961-1975. When the car was first introduced, the E-Type Jaguar was powered by a 268 horsepower 3.8-liter with a six-cylinder engine. That gave the car a top speed of 150 miles per hour.

The 1963 Porsche 911 Is Near Perfection

The 1963 Porsche 911 Is Near Perfection
Wikipedia
Wikipedia

In 1963, Porsche gave the world its first look at what would become one of the most successful sports cars of all-time. Today, the 911 has evolved through seven different model generations and remains as popular as ever.

Porsche worked to improve some aspects of the car every year, altering it only to improve the performance of the model. The overall mechanical layout of the Porsche 911 is essentially the same as it was in the first Type 911 introduced in 1963. Additionally, the profile of today’s car mimics the original to near perfection.

The 1969 Triumph TR6 Saw Success Around The World

The 1969 Triumph TR6 Saw Success Around The World
The Bid Watcher
The Bid Watcher

The ’69 Triumph is seen as more of a success globally than it was in its home country. Only a small fraction of its total sales came from the United Kingdom, while the rest came from across the globe.

The power of the vehicle came from a 2.5-liter six-cylinder engine producing 104 horsepower in the United States. The English market versions of the car provided 150 horsepower. A four-speed all-synchronous manual transmission feeds the engine’s output to the rear wheels.

The 1961 Chrysler 300G Coupe Came With A Racing Manual Transmission

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As the decade turned, so did the look of the Chrysler 300G Coupe. Its grille become wider at the top, and the headlights were angled inward at the bottom. The fins got sharper and the rear lights were moved to be under them.

From a mechanics standpoint, the cross-ram “short ram” and “long ram” engines remained the same, although, the expensive French manual transmission was dropped, replaced by a more expensive Chrysler racing manual transmission.

The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Was A Beast When It Came To Drag Racing

1969-Chevrolet-Camaro-55611
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

If you want a car that’s as fast as it is powerful, look no further than the ’69 Camaro. This car was designed in part by famous drag racer Dick Harrell. He designed the car to perform well under drag racing conditions. The ’69 Camaro came with a 427 cu in a big-block V8 engine called the ZL1.

It quickly gained a reputation for being one of America’s most powerful muscle cars. Only 69 of these cars were ever built, making this model one of the rarest and most sought after in America.

The 1968 Plymouth Roadrunner Hemi Was Simple Yet Sophisticated

The 1968 Plymouth Roadrunner Hemi Was Simple Yet Sophisticated
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It may have a name that’s inspired by the Looney Tunes character, but the Road Hemi is all business. The ’68 Plymouth became a popular choice for a muscle car in the late sixties since it offered customers a back-to-basics package that provided everything people wanted in a muscle car.

Plymouth put emphasis on the car’s performance, leaving all the styling intricacies behind, including the interior where “added options” became a foreign concept. On a side note, Plymouth actually paid Warner Bros. $50,000 for the rights to use the name.

The 1963 Studebaker Avanti Broke 29 Records

The 1963 Studebaker Avanti Broke 29 Records
American Car Collector Magazine
American Car Collector Magazine

When it was released, the Studebaker Corporation sold their Avanti as “America’s only four passenger high-performance personal car.” The best part of the car was how it combined performance with safety. At the Bonnesville Salt Flats, it broke 29 records.

Unofrtunately, Studebaker had a problem delivering quality versions of the car to showroom floors. By December of 1963, the the car was discontinued and Studebaker closed its factory doors a few years. By the time they returned, other automakers made the market impossible to get back into.