The Fastest-Depreciating Cars On The Market

It’s far from a secret that the majority of new cars will lose value right as you drive off the lot. What you might not know is that certain vehicles depreciate a lot quicker. While depreciation can be terrible for buyers who bought their automobiles brand new, it creates great deals on the used car market. After all, who wouldn’t want to purchase a low-mileage car that’s only a few years old and costs less than half of the original price tag? Just make sure you’re on the right side of the deal with these fastest-depreciating cars on the market.

Mercedes-Benz SL

Mercedes-Benz SL
Chris Rutter/N-Photo Magazine/Future via Getty Images
Chris Rutter/N-Photo Magazine/Future via Getty Images

The Mercedes-Benz SL Class has a long history, as the first generation of the car was released in the 1950s. The upscale convertible combines the irreplaceable drop-top driving experience with a lavish interior, as well as a selection of luxurious comfort and safety features. A brand new Mercedes-Benz SL is rather costly, starting at just below $100,000 for the base model.

Luckily for used car buyers, the SL is one of the fastest-depreciating cars in the Mercedes-Benz lineup. A unit from the early 2010s can be found for as little as $30,000.

Lincoln MKZ

Lincoln MKZ
John Shearer/Getty Images for Lincoln
John Shearer/Getty Images for Lincoln

Lincoln’s midsize 4-door sedan, the MKZ, was eventually pulled from the market after the 2020 model year. The vehicle had been on sale since 2006 and saw two generations throughout its production run. While the newer, second-gen units still retain much of their value, first-gen units plummeted over the last couple of years.

The stylish MKZ started at around $36,000 before options. Today, you could easily find an 11-year old unit for as little as $6,000. In comparison, buyers in the market for a used 2017 MKZ would have to spend $25,000 at the very least.

Dodge Magnum

Dodge Magnum
JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images
JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images

The first-ever Dodge Magnum was much different from the controversial station wagon released by Chrysler in the mid-2000s. In fact, the first-gen Magnum was actually a stylish coupe introduced in 1971. The successor does not have much in common with the original Magnum, other than the nameplate.

Many buyers were critical of the design of the Magnum, at least at first. While it is indeed far from the prettiest station wagon of all time, the Magnum does pack a powerful engine beneath the hood. Best of all, you could now become the owner of one for as little as $6,000.

Maserati Quattroporte

Maserati Quattroporte
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

Many industry professionals and automotive journalists would argue whether the Maserati Ghibli was really worth its crazy sticker price. While the four-door sedan is the Italian automaker’s entry-level model, there is no debate that a starting price of around $70,000 for the underpowered base model is rather steep. Especially when the quality of the vehicle does not live up to the expectations.

Questionable build-quality paired with reliability issues dramatically affected the value of the Ghibli. Buyers can find a 5-year old unit in decent condition for as little as $30,000.

Honda Civic

honda-civic-loses-value
Honda
Honda

The mighty Civic is one of the most reliable and fuel-efficient vehicles within its price range. Honda’s flagship does, however, depreciate faster than many of its competitors. In fact, a brand new Civic would lose as much as 16% of its original value one year after driving off the lot. A 6-year old Honda Civic only retains half of its sticker price.

Petrolheads are in for a treat, as the performance-oriented Honda Civic Type R does not depreciate as badly as the base model. It’s even considered to be one of the best hot hatches in terms of retaining value.

Jaguar XF

Jaguar XF
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The XF is a stylish four-door sedan that was initially launched by Jaguar for the 2007 model year. The vehicle was developed to be an alternative for the BMW 5-Series or the Audi A6. Jaguar offers all kinds of trim levels of their flagship sedan, ranging from a fuel-efficient 2.0L flat-four all the way up to a powerful V6 motor.

Buyers willing to purchase a brand new XF would have to spend around $50 000 for the base model. In comparison, a unit that’s merely three years old will only have retained a quarter of its original value.

Mazda 6

Mazda 6
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

Mazda unveiled the replacement of the Capella sedan for the 2002 model year. The vehicle has been in production ever since. The latest, third-gen debuted in 2012 and was facelifted six years later. Due to frequent stylistic changes and updates, the value of the Mazda 6 plummets as soon as the vehicle drives off the lot.

Thanks to the quick depreciation, buyers today can pick up a 10-year old second-gen unit for as little as $8,000. That’s quite a drop from the $25,000 MSRP, before any extra options.

Cadillac SRX

Cadillac SRX
Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If you’re in the market for a stylish crossover SUV, the Cadillac SRX may very well be the ideal pick for you. This upscale SUV first went on sale for the 2004 model year. The SRX was eventually discontinued 12 years later. Two different generations were sold during the car’s production run.

While the first-gen may appeal to some potential buyers, its successor sold from 2010 was certainly more aesthetically pleasing. A 2010 SRX can be picked up starting at around $6000, which is quite a drop from the original $35 000 price tag.

Jeep Commander

Jeep Commander
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

The Commander was introduced for the 2006 model year as a direct successor of the WJ Grand Cherokee. The clever vehicle combines the versatility of a full-size SUV, along with the fuel efficiency and practicality of a smaller automobile. The base model came powered by a 3.0L V6, though a more powerful version with a 5.7L Hemi V8 was available too.

Back in 2010, a brand new Commander would start at around $31,000 for the V6-powered base model without any extra options. Today, that same vehicle can be picked up for as little as $5,000.

Chevrolet Camaro

Chevrolet Camaro
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Let’s be honest, who wouldn’t want to own a Chevrolet Camaro? Chevrolet’s iconic muscle car is one of the best picks within its price range. Buyers can pick from a variety of different powerplants, ranging from a fuel-efficient 275-horsepower flat-four for the base model, all the way to the supercharged 6.2L V8 rated at 650 horses that can be found in the ZL1 variant.

What’s more, the value of the Camaro drops faster than you might expect. In fact, it depreciates by about $8,000 a year on average.

Nissan Leaf

Nissan Leaf
Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Leaf may not be as exciting as the previously mentioned Chevrolet Camaro. However, it may just be the perfect pick for buyers who are in the market for a fully electric daily driver. This cute 5-door compact first went on sale in 2010. The prices of the first-gen units dropped significantly, following the debut of the second-gen Leaf for the 2017 model year.

Initially, a brand new Leaf would start at around $25,000 back in 2010. Today, that same first-gen unit could be picked up for as little as $5,000!

Audi A6

Audi A6
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The Audi A6 has earned its reputation as one of the best upscale sedans on the market. It was first introduced on the market in the mid-90s and has been a crucial part of the Audi lineup ever since. The German automaker is currently selling the fifth generation of the A6. Moreover, frequent facelifts and stylistic changes made the A6 one of the worst offenders in terms of depreciation.

The base model of the latest A6 starts at around $55,000. The vehicle will lose over half of its value within the first three years!

Cadillac XTS

Cadillac XTS
Visual China Group via Getty Images
Visual China Group via Getty Images

The XTS is an upscale sedan that was sold by Cadillac between the 2013 and 2019 model years. The vehicle was eventually dropped from the lineup in favor of the all-new Cadillac CT5. In effect, the prices of the predecessor began plummeting rapidly.

These days, you could find a well-equipped 2013 Cadillac XTS for as little as half of its original sticker price. If you’re in the market for a used XTS, you’ll surely spend less than the $45,000 MSRP.

GMC Yukon

GMC Yukon
Kris Connor/Getty Images
Kris Connor/Getty Images

The GMC Yukon is a full-size SUV that has been around since the early 90s. A rebadged version of the Yukon is also sold as the Chevrolet Tahoe with minor stylistic changes. It also shares the same platform with the Cadillac Escalade and the Chevy Suburban.

The upscale Yukon starts at around $50,000 for the base model. It will lose the majority of its value practically right after driving off the lot, though. A 5-year old GMC Yukon will only hold around half of its value.

Lamborghini Aventador

Capture
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

The beautiful Lamborghini Aventador is a big ticket item– off the lot this model goes for $442,409! This supercar costs more than some people’s homes, but its value depreciates much quicker. Like other cars, once owed, the Aventador rapidly decreases in value.

However, it’s much different than other vehicles, as the estimated 24-39% depreciation in just 5 years decreases the value by $172,622. The Aventador is exhilarating to drive, but it comes at a big cost both up front and down the line.

Mercedes Benz Maybach 57S

Mercedes Benz Maybach 57S
Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images
Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images

The luxurious 57S was the ultimate land yacht money could buy back in the 2000s. Aside from the lavish design inside and out, this S Class-based sedan is also one of the worst offenders in terms of depreciation. This Maybach quickly became infamous for barely retaining any of its original value.

Back in the 2000s, it’d cost at least $400,000 to become the owner of a brand new 57S, before any extra options. Today, you could easily pick up a top-spec unit for as little as $50,000. That is quite a drop, to say the least.

Chrysler Aspen

Chrysler Aspen
Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Chrysler Aspen was a spacious SUV sold throughout the late 2000s. This practical vehicle was actually a rebadged version of the second generation of the Dodge Durango, along with minor stylistic changes. They came with all kinds of powerplants ranging from a fuel-efficient V6 up to a powerful Hemi V8. Chrysler even sold a V8-powered hybrid variant of the car!

The Aspen was discontinued merely two years after its debut due to low sales. A brand new 2009 Chrysler Aspen would start at around $40,000. Today, that same vehicle can be found for less than a quarter of that price.

Hyundai Sonata

Hyundai Sonata
STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images
STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images

The sixth generation of the Hyundai Sonata was a solid midsize sedan sold by the Korean automaker starting from the 2010 model year. The vehicle was eventually replaced by its refreshed successor five years later. Luckily, at least for used car buyers, the release of the seventh-gen Sonata caused the value of the older generations to plummet significantly.

Back in 2014, a buyer would have to pay at least $21,000 for the base model. Today, you could purchase a well-equipped 2014 Sonata for as little as $7,000.

Hummer H2

Hummer H2
Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The infamous H2 never quite lived up to the original H1. After all, the H2 was not even based on a military vehicle, while the mighty H1 was essentially a road-going version of the Humvee. Hummer attempted to market the H2 as a luxurious and more civilized SUV, though buyers were not too happy with it from the get-go.

Back in the 2000s, a brand new H2 would set you back at least $60,000. Today, however, used Hummer H2s start at just $12,000. Don’t forget about the expensive maintenance and terrible fuel economy, though!

Lexus GS

Lexus GS
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The upscale Lexus GS made headlines back in 2020, following Toyota’s announcement to discontinue the sedan in North America before the end of the year. Sadly, the sales figures of the latest fourth-gen Lexus GS were lower than expected. On the other hand, buyers are able to take advantage of the car’s rapid depreciation.

Back in 2013, a brand new fourth-gen Lexus LS would start at around $50,000. The vehicle barely retained half of its original value. Today, a 2013 Lexus LS can be found for less than $20,000.

Volkswagen Passat

Volkswagen Passat
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images

The Volkswagen Passat is essentially a European counterpart of the Toyota Camry. This fuel-efficient vehicle can become a solid daily driver ideal for use in cities as well as long road trips. In fact, a Passat set the world record for the best non-hybrid fuel economy back in 2013. It achieved nearly 80 miles per gallon!

Originally, a brand new Passat would start at roughly $25,000 back in 2014. Today, well-maintained examples can be found starting at just $6,000.

Mercedes-Benz CL Class

Mercedes-Benz CL Class
Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The CL-Class is a gorgeous luxury coupe that dates back to the 1990s. The latest, third generation of the car, was sold in the United States until 2014. The German automaker offered all kinds of trim levels and powerful engine options for the car. It was one of just a few Mercedes-Benz that had a V8 under the hood as standard. In its least powerful variant, the CL550 produces 429 horsepower!

Back in 2013, you’d have to spend at least $115,000 to purchase one. Today, you can find used examples starting at $25,000.

Hyundai Genesis Coupe

Hyundai Genesis Coupe
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hyundai developed the Genesis Coupe as an exciting and sporty addition to the Korean automaker’s lineup. The coupe initially hit the market for the 2009 model year. Hyundai’s attempt to create a car that’s extremely fun to drive proved to be rather successful. The Genesis Coupe was eventually discontinued after 2016.

In the early 2010s, a brand new Genesis Coupe would start at around $27,000. Today, early production units can be picked up starting at $6,500. Note that the newer models built in 2013 and up are slightly more powerful and a bit quicker.

BMW 4 Series

BMW 4 Series
Gerlach Delissen – Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images
Gerlach Delissen – Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images

The 4-Series is one of the best-looking cars in its segment. The German automaker offers all kinds of trim levels of the car, such as a two-door convertible or the high-performance M4. Like the previously mentioned Mercedes Benz S-Class, the drop-top version of the vehicle is the worst in terms of depreciation.

A brand new BMW 4-Series starts at roughly $50,000 before any options. However, a unit that’s just 3 years old can be purchased for half of the original MSRP.

Aston Martin V8 Vantage

Aston Martin V8 Vantage
Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The V8 version of the Aston Martin Vantage was always overlooked by its souped-up cousin. After all, it did not make much sense to purchase a V8-powered Vantage for a whopping $120,000, given that the more powerful V12 version was available for less than $200,000. In effect, the V8 Vantage plummeted in value shortly after its debut. The prices took another hit following the release of the next-gen Vantage in late 2017.

Today, you could become the owner of a 10-year old Vantage for around $50,000 for a well-preserved unit in decent condition.

Chrysler 300C

Chrysler 300C
Jonathan Alcorn/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jonathan Alcorn/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Chrysler introduced the stylish 300C for the 2005 model year. The base model packed a V6 beneath the hood, while the optional Hemi V8 provided plenty of power for the driver. Unsurprisingly, sales figures were through the roof. Who wouldn’t want a car that looks as classy as a Bentley for only a fraction of the price? After all, the MSRP started at around $35,000.

The 300C was eventually replaced by the all-new gen in 2011. The prices of the original 300C plunged as a result. Today, you could buy a well-equipped example for as little as $5,000.

Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

America’s best-selling pony car is another victim of rapid depreciation. While the fact that the Mustang does not retain much of its value is far from good news for the original owners, plummeting prices attract used car buyers.

It would cost at least $35,000 to drive out of a Ford dealership in a brand new Mustang. However, Mustangs lose around half of their original value 7 years after the release. The value keeps dipping until the car turns 2 decades old. After that, it starts to pick back up again.

Fiat 500C

Fiat 500C
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

The cute 500C is the perfect car for a hot, sunny day. This cool version of the mighty Fiat 500 features a convertible body style. The 500C combines all of the practicality and fuel efficiency you can expect from a regular 500, plus a drop-top. What more could a car owner possibly ask for?

The base Fiat 500 Cabrio starts at a little over $17,000. A three-year-old model can be found for as low as $10,000. Note that the prices can surge directly before the summer!

Mini Cooper

Mini Cooper
Piti A Sahakorn/LightRocket via Getty Images
Piti A Sahakorn/LightRocket via Getty Images

The history of the iconic Mini Cooper dates back to the early 1960s. The car has undoubtedly evolved over the last decades, it has even changed manufacturers multiple times. While the vehicle does get updated every few years, the DNA of the original Mini is alive in the latest models, too.

Partially due to the frequent facelifts and upgrades, the 21st century Mini Cooper does not retain its value very well. 5-year old units can easily be found for half of the original $20,000 sticker price.

Audi A8

Audi A8
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The classy A8 is Audi’s flagship luxury sedan. A quick peek at the A8 is enough to realize that whoever owns one means business, as the vehicle looks both upscale and aggressive. As you can guess, A8s lose value quickly thanks to frequent facelifts. The latest generation of the A8 debuted for the 2018 model year and caused the prices of its predecessor to plummet rapidly.

A brand new 2021 Audi A8 starts at around $85,000 before any options. In comparison, a unit that’s merely 2 years old can be found for less than $70,000.

Volvo S80

Volvo S80
Casper Hedberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Casper Hedberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Volvo cars rightfully earned the reputation of being solid, reliable, and affordable. Not to mention that these vehicles built by the Swedish automaker are widely considered to be the safest automobiles on the planet. Over the last decades, Volvo invented a wide array of different safety features that have become standard ever since, such as side-impact airbags and blind-spot monitoring. The S80 is the ideal pick for a safe and reliable daily driver.

Today, you could become the owner of a 10-year-old Volvo S80 starting at just $5,000. That’s quite a drop from the original $37,000 sticker price!

Nissan Maxima

Nissan Maxima
Dania Maxwell/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Dania Maxwell/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If you’re looking for a high-performance machine that’s bound to turn heads wherever you go, the Maxima is definitely not the right choice. In fact, many petrolheads would consider this fuel-efficient sedan to be bland and downright boring. While the Maxima may not be the most exciting vehicle money could buy, it is definitely a sensible choice.

The latest eighth-gen Maxima rolled off the production line in 2015, causing its predecessor to plummet in value. Today, you can purchase a 6-year old Maxima for around $10,000, which is around a third of its original sticker price.

BMW 7-Series

BMW 7-Series
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The 7 Series was originally released as BMW’s answer to the Mercedes-Benz S Class. Like the S Class, the BMW 7-Series is the ultimate and most luxurious sedan built by the automaker. It has been a vital part of BMW’s lineup since the late 70s. The latest, sixth-generation G11 7 Series, debuted for the 2016 model year.

Naturally, the 7 Series loses value as soon as it drives off the lot. In fact, the sedan depreciates over 60% within the first three years! A 3-year old 7 Series starts at around $40,000, while a brand new unit retails at almost $100,000 for the base model.

Acura ZDX

Acura ZDX
Brian Ach/WireImage
Brian Ach/WireImage

Honda’s attempt to sell a luxury crossover SUV under the Acura subsidiary clearly did not work well. The vehicle was introduced for the 2010 model year starting at $50,000. The questionable exterior design and the steep price tag were both reflected in the low sales figures. Honda eventually ended up discontinuing the model just 3 years after its debut.

While the ZDX may not have been a great deal when it was new, it is a whole different story today. A used ZDX can be found starting at a fifth of its original sticker price. That is quite a bargain considering all of the luxurious features, a high-quality finish, and the original MSRP.

Smart Fortwo

New York International Auto Show 2018
Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images
Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The cute Fortwo is the most successful subcompact of the 21st century. The car was first introduced on the market by the Smart subsidiary of Mercedes-Benz in the late 90s. It has been in production ever since. The Fortwo is available in nearly 50 countries around the world, and its production surpassed 1.7 million units in 2015.

The latest third-gen Fortwo hit the US market for the 2014 model year. Right now, you could pick up a four-year-old Fortwo for a little over $6,000, which is less than half of the original sticker price.

Audi A4

Audi A4
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The A4 is yet another upscale sedan sold by the German automaker. The vehicle is available in all sorts of trim levels, starting from the fuel-efficient 1.4L-powered base model. For those who seek the best performance, Audi offers the powerful RS4 rated at 444 horsepower generated by its V6 motor. In effect, the RS4 can sprint to 60 miles per hour in just 4.1 seconds.

The A4 is one of the worst offenders in terms of depreciation. In fact, an A4 loses nearly 40% of its original value after three years of ownership. Note that some trim levels depreciate even quicker.

Infiniti Q50

Infiniti Q50
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The Q50 was launched by Infiniti as a rival for the Audi A4 and the BMW 3-Series. That’s why it should not come as a surprise that the Q50 depreciates incredibly quickly, just like its German rivals. While compact luxury saloons such as the Q50 may not be the best choice when new, a used model from a few years back is quite a bargain given the features that can be found inside.

The Q50 loses over half of its original sticker price within three years of ownership. You could find a 2018 model for around $23,000.

Nissan Rogue

Nissan Rogue
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The Rogue is a solid pick for any buyer who is after a fuel-efficient, reliable crossover SUV. The vehicle was launched for the 2008 model year and has been on the market ever since. Nissan recently unveiled the latest, third-gen Rogue that is available starting from the current model year.

Frequent facelifts and generation changes are always perfect news for used car buyers. In fact, a Nissan Rogue will lose nearly half of its value 5 years from driving off the lot. In practice, this means that a 2016 Rogue can be found for around $14,000.

Mercedes-Benz S Class Cabriolet

Mercedes-Benz S Class Cabriolet
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

Nothing screams luxury more than a two-door version of the lavish Mercedes-Benz S Class, complete with a drop-top ideal for long drives in the summer. All variants of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class plummet in value very quickly, and the Cabriolet is no exception.

After three years of ownership, a convertible S Class only retains around a quarter of its original sticker price of around $140,000 before options. While that’s not the best news for those who have bought them brand new, the plummeting value does turn a used S Class Cabriolet into an absolute bargain.

Volvo V60

Volvo V60
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

The V60 is an upscale wagon manufactured by Swedish automaker Volvo. The vehicle is considered to be one of the safest production cars on the market. The base model has been around since 2011. What’s more, Volvo also offered the performance-oriented V60 Polestar which makes 350 horsepower!

The debut of the all-new, redesigned V60 for the 2019 model year caused the first-gen to plummet in value. You could easily find a 3-year-old unit for $20,000, while 6-year-old examples are worth another $5,000 less.

Ford Fusion Hybrid

Ford Fusion Hybrid
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Ford Fusion is a solid pick for a modern, budget-friendly daily driver. Not to mention that the hybrid-powered version is solid in terms of fuel economy, too.

A brand new Fusion Hybrid starts at around $25,000 before options. The vehicle loses over half of its original value within just three years of ownership. In effect, you can find well-maintained units from 2017 or 2018 for an average price of just $13,500. Considering all of that the Fusion has got to offer, it is quite a bargain indeed.