The Craziest Wings In The Car World

Most car enthusiasts can agree that large rear wings are a cool feature to see. While obnoxious aftermarket wings that serve no purpose are not everyone’s cup of tea, a tasteful aerodynamic rear spoiler can give the automobile a more aggressive look.

Some of the wings in this lineup are made to generate the maximum amount of downforce, others are purely for show and can even worsen the aerodynamic capabilities of the vehicle. Check out the craziest rear spoilers and wings in the automotive industry.

Apollo Intensa Emozione

The Apollo IE...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The Intensa Emozione is a hardcore hypercar developed by Apollo Automobil, an automaker founded by Roland Gumpert in 2004. Back in the mid-2000s, Roland Gumpert released the high-performance Gumpert Apollo supercar which was one of the fastest cars at the time. Over a decade later, the automaker is back with an all-new fascinating creation.

The Intensa Emozione is powered by a 6.3L V12 motor that peaks at 770 horsepower. The IE costs a whopping $2.7 million dollars in the US. Only 10 units will be made in total, all of which have already been sold.

Zenvo TSR-S

The Zenvo TSR-S...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The Zenvo TSR-S is a roadgoing variant of the Zenvo TSR race car. The supercar is powered by an enormous 5.8L twin-turbocharged V8 which produces nearly 1200 horsepower! In effect, the TSR-S can sprint to 124 miles per hour in less than 7 seconds!

The redesigned TSR-S features a massive carbon fiber rear spoiler mounted in the back of the car. The wing can adjust freely to improve corner stabilization and air braking, as well as overall downforce. TSR-S’ massive wing is one of the most advanced rear spoilers in the entire industry.

McLaren Senna

The London Concours
John Keeble/Getty Images
John Keeble/Getty Images

The Senna is McLaren’s third addition to the Ultimate Series, alongside the McLaren P1 and the legendary F1 from the 1990s. Despite being a part of the same series, the Senna is not a successor to either one. The hypercar is powered by a souped-up version of the 4.0L V8 found in the McLaren 720S.

The Senna can easily be distinguished by its massive rear wing. Like the vast majority of the car’s design, it is not simply there for show. The adjustable wing improves the aerodynamics and doubles as an airbrake.

McLaren P1

The McLaren P1...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The McLaren P1 is, without a doubt, one of the best-looking hypercars ever made. The designer, Frank Stephenson, admitted that the P1 was partially inspired by a sailfish he had seen on holiday in Miami. The hypercar’s unique styling paired with exceptional performance and a limited production run all make this hypercar highly sought-after by wealthy car collectors. McLaren reportedly only made 375 units of the P1.

At the rear, the P1 is fitted with an adjustable spoiler made using technologies found in Formula 1. According to the automaker, the rear wing generates over 1300 pounds of downforce at 160 miles per hour.

Koenigsegg Jesko

The Koenigsegg Jesko...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

Koenigsegg is still a relatively new name in the automotive world. In fact, the first vehicle built by the Swedish automaker was the CC8S hypercar. It was introduced back in 2002, and the manufacturer has been making some of the world’s finest high-performance cars ever since.

The Jesko debuted at the 2019 Geneva International Motor Show as the successor to the Agera RS. The name of the car is a tribute to the founder’s father, Jesko von Koenigsegg. During the unveiling of the Jesko, the founder of Koenigsegg announced that their new hypercar was the first car in the world to surpass 300 miles per hour. The car’s enormous rear wing hardly goes unnoticed.

Koenigsegg Agera Final Edition

Koenigsegg Agera Vader
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

Koenigsegg’s flagship model, the Koenigsegg Agera, had been in production up until 2018. To celebrate stopping the production of the high-performance machine, the Swedish automaker unveiled the incredibly exclusive Final Edition. Its production run was strictly limited to just two units, which became the last two Ageras ever built.

The 2 Ageras FE were named Thor and Vader (seen in the photo above). Both of the cars share wings with the Agera RS, a souped-up variant of Koenigsegg’s flagship model. Apart from adding lots of downforce at high speeds, the spoiler of the Agera FE looks rather extravagant.

Koenigsegg Regera

Switzerland - 85th Geneva International Motor Show 2015
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images

The Regera is Koenigsegg’s first-ever plug-in hybrid vehicle. The two-door hypercar has been in production since 2016 and has earned a spot as one of the most high-tech automobiles of all time. Koenigsegg plans to only build 80 Regeras in total, and all units have already been sold.

Underneath the aerodynamic body lays a 5.0L V8 paired with electric motors that are primarily there to increase power at low speeds. The Regera produces nearly 1800 horsepower in total! Some of the car’s notable features include an innovative one-speed transmission. The hydraulic rear wing is hard to miss, it was designed to increase the car’s downforce. According to Koenigsegg, the Regera generates 990 pounds of downforce at 155 mph.

Lamborghini Veneno

Lamborghini Unveils New Veneno Roadster
Claudio Villa/Getty Images
Claudio Villa/Getty Images

Many automotive enthusiasts consider Lamborghini to be the absolute leader when it comes to manufacturing high-performance supercars. After all, the Italian automaker invented the supercar back in the 1960s when the Miura was unveiled. Lamborghini has a long history of creating some of the world’s finest supercars ever since.

The Veneno is one of the most expensive new cars in the world, doubling as one of the most extravagant-looking automobiles ever. It debuted in 2013 with a sticker price of around $4 million. Lamborghini limited the production to just 14 units in total, all of which sold out practically instantly.

Lamborghini Aventador SVJ

The Lamborghini Aventador SVJ...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The Aventador Super Veloce Jota, or SVJ for short, is a hardcore track-focused variant of the already insane Lamborghini Aventador S. The vehicle quickly made headlines when it broke the world record at the infamous Nurburgring, completing the Nordschleife loop in just 6 minutes and 44 seconds.

The Aventador SVJ is Lamborghini’s first V12-powered supercar that features the innovative ALA aerodynamic system. According to the automaker, ALA allows the SVJ to reach 40% more downforce than the standard Lamborghini Aventador SV. As you can guess, the enormous wing fitted on the rear of the car contributes to its aerodynamic performance.

Pagani Zonda 760 Oliver Evolution

Pagani Zonda Oliver Evolution
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

This particular vehicle isn’t a standard production car. Only one unit of the Zonda 760 Oliver Evolution was made. The extravagant Italian supercar is based on a Pagani Zonda 760 RS, which is another very special one-off. The Zonda 760 Oliver Evolution is powered by a 750-horsepower 7.3L V12 powerplant built by Mercedes-Benz.

This one-off can easily be distinguished from any other Pagani Zonda by its large rear wing. The spoiler was engineered by a leader in GT motorsport to achieve the most downforce. Even though it plays a role in the car’s aerodynamics, this rear spoiler looks absolutely insane.

Pagani Huayra BC

Tokyo Auto Salon 2018
Jun Sato/Getty Images
Jun Sato/Getty Images

The Huayra BC, named after a friend of Horacio Pagani (the founder of Pagani Automobili), is a track-focused variant of the standard Huayra hypercar. Pagani kept the 6.0L V12 motor found in the base model, though it is modified to produce up to 745 horsepower. The team at Pagani also reduced the weight of the vehicle by nearly 300 pounds by using a material called carbon triax rather than regular carbon fiber.

Of course, aerodynamics is a key factor to improve the performance of the Huayra BC, and the enormous wing fitted on the car helps reduce drag and increases downforce. Pagani only built 20 units of the hardcore Huayra BC in total.

Dodge Viper ACR

The Dodge Viper ACR...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The latest, fifth generation of the Viper was released for the 2013 model year. A year later, the American automaker presented a concept of the track-focused, souped-up ACR variant of the Viper based on the latest platform. The Viper ACR was finally introduced for the 2016 model year.

The hardcore ACR variant of the Viper can easily be distinguished by its unique aerodynamic package made from carbon fiber, particularly the front splitter and the humongous rear spoiler. The optional Extreme Aero Package for the ACR replaced the wing with an even larger one. A Viper ACR equipped with this package generates up to 2000 pounds of downforce when cornering!

Chevrolet Corvette C7 ZR1 (ZTK Package)

Chevrolet Unveils It's New 2019 ZR1 Corvette
Kevork Djansezian
Kevork Djansezian

The ZR1 variant of the seventh-generation Corvette debuted for the 2019 model year. The souped-up sports car is based on the Corvette Z06, though it is powered by an all-new supercharged LT5 V8 motor. The car’s powerplant peaks at a whopping 755 horsepower, allowing the ZR1 to reach 214 miles per hour.

The aerodynamic package of the ZR1 was developed in wind tunnels to work as efficiently as possible. The optional ZTK Performance Package adds a massive carbon-fiber rear wing fixed on the back of the car. Thanks to the rear wing, a ZTK-equipped ZR1 generates 60% more downforce as opposed to a standard ZR1.

Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

2018 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The ZL1 is the highest variant of the sixth-generation Chevrolet Camaro. The 2-door muscle car is powered by the same motor found in the seventh-gen Corvette Z06, the 650-horsepower supercharged LT4 V8. What’s more, the 2017 ZL1 is one of the first production cars fitted with an automatic 10-speed transmission. A manual variant with a six-speed stick-shift was available, too.

A year after the debut of the ZL1, Chevrolet introduced the optional LE package for the car. The LE package improved the car’s aerodynamics and added an all-new racing-inspired suspension system. The Camaro ZL1 is one of the fastest cars ever made by Chevrolet, and one of the quickest modern American cars overall.

Porsche 911 991.1 GT3

Switzerland - 83rd Geneva International Motor Show
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images

The pre-facelift roadgoing variant of the Porsche GT3 racecar based on the 991 generation of the iconic 911 was first unveiled in Geneva in 2013. The car is powered by Porsche’s 3.8L flat-six boxer motor that produces up to 475 horsepower. The powerplant can rev all the way up to 9000 RPM! The GT3’s motor is paired with a dual-clutch transmission for quick, seamless shifts.

The GT3 can easily be distinguished from the base model by its many aerodynamic features, particularly the large rear wing. According to the German automaker, the 991.1 GT3 can reach 60 miles per hour in just 3.5 seconds. The car lapped the infamous Nordschleife loop at the Nurburgring in just 7 minutes and 25 seconds.

Porsche 911 991.1 GT3 RS

2016 Porsche GT3 RS
Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images
Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images

Porsche did not stop with the 991.1 GT3. Instead, the German manufacturer released the souped-up Renn Sport, or RS in short, variant just two years later. The 3.8L boxer was gone in favor of the new 4.0L flat-six that produced 490 horsepower.

Some of the features introduced for the 991.1 GT3 RS include an all-new rear wing (even larger than the one fitted on the GT3!), a roof made from magnesium, an optional roll cage, full bucket seats inspired by Porsche’s 918 hypercar, or aggressive intakes on the fenders. The GT3 RS lapped the Nordschleife 5 seconds quicker than the regular GT3.

Porsche 911 991 GT2 RS

Porsche 991 GT2 RS, France
Richard Pardon/Future Publishing via Getty Images
Richard Pardon/Future Publishing via Getty Images

For the first time ever, Porsche did not release a standard GT2 variant and instead headed straight for the hardcore GT2 RS. Like all previous GT2s, the 991 GT2 RS features a turbocharged powerplant. The car is powered by a twin-turbo 3.8L flat-six that generates a whopping 691 horsepower.

The exterior of the GT2 RS is similar to the previously mentioned GT3 RS based on the same generation of the 911, the 991. The car also features a roof made from magnesium or a massive carbon-fiber rear wing. The GT2 RS set the world record around the Nurburgring in 2017, lapping the track in 6 minutes and 47 seconds. It was later dethroned by the Lamborghini Aventador SVJ.

Bentley Continental GT3-R

Bentley Continental GT3-R
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The GT3-R variant of the Bentley Continental is heavily inspired by the vehicle’s track-only race car counterpart, the Continental GT3. The souped-up GT3-R is street legal, it is also 220 pounds lighter than a regular Continental. The car’s V8 powerplant is modified to make over 570 horsepower. Only 300 units of the GT3-R were built.

The GT3-R is all about performance. Hence the car’s unique aerodynamic features, such as the carbon-fiber rear wing or the carbon-fiber intakes on the hood. The GT3-R can accelerate to 60 miles per hour in as fast as 3.3 seconds!

McLaren Speedtail

The McLaren Speedtail...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

This unique hypercar is McLaren’s latest addition to the automaker’s Ultimate Series. This hybrid is powered by a modified version of the twin-turbo 4.0L V8 motor found in the McLaren 720S, along with a 310-horsepower electric motor. The total power output is rated at a whopping 1036 horsepower!

Like every other McLaren, the Speedtail was designed with peak performance and aerodynamics in mind. The rear of the car is fitted with two active ailerons that open when necessary. Although this solution is not exactly a rear spoiler, the innovative aero solution deserves to be mentioned.

McLaren 720S

2020 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The 720S is the second car introduced in the McLaren Super Series, and it is a direct successor to the 650S. The two-door supercar was unveiled in Geneva in 2017, it is still in production today.

As the 720S is all about performance, the engineering team at McLaren fitted a large active wing at the back of the car. The 710-horsepower supercar generates 50% more downforce than its predecessor. According to Robert Melville who designed the 720S, the stylish exterior design was inspired by a great white shark.

Bugatti Divo

Press Preview Prior the
Richard Bord/Getty Images
Richard Bord/Getty Images

Bugatti Divo is one of the most exquisite modern automobiles in the world. The prestigious automaker has announced it’s only building 40 units of the car, all of which have reportedly sold out already. The name of the car pays tribute to Albert Divo, a successful Bugatti racing driver from the 1920s.

While the front of the Divo somewhat resembles the Chiron hypercar, the rear-end design is a completely different ballgame. The massive spoiler fitted on the rear of the hypercar completes its powerful, aggressive look. The Divo is even faster than it looks, the car can reach 236 miles per hour!

Lamborghini Huracan Performante

Geneva International Motor Show - VW group evening
Uli Deck/picture alliance via Getty Images
Uli Deck/picture alliance via Getty Images

The Performante is a high-performance, track-oriented variant of the Lamborghini Huracan. It was unveiled in 2017 and was the automaker’s first vehicle fitted with the innovative ALA aerodynamic system. At the launch of the car in Geneva, Lamborghini announced that the car had broken the Nurburgring record, lapping the Nordschleife in 6 minutes and 52 seconds. It was the fastest production car lap time around the infamous Ring at the time.

Lamborghini fitted a massive forged carbon-fiber rear spoiler on the Performante. Along with other ALA aero features, the car is said to produce 750% more downforce than a standard Huracan.

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

2019 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 2
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The GT500 is a well-known moniker in the world of Ford’s Mustang. The original Shelby Mustang was built by Shelby American led by Carroll Shelby himself. The legendary nameplate was revived in the mid-2000s, although this time it was developed by Ford. The latest, third-generation Ford Performance Shelby GT500 was unveiled for the 2020 model year.

The GT500 is quite simply the ultimate Mustang. Under the hood, the coupe packs a 760-horsepower 5.2L “Predator” supercharged V8, paired with a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. The hardcore variant of the Mustang can easily be distinguished by its aggressive exterior styling and, of course, the large rear spoiler.

Ford GT

2020 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The history of the Ford GT dates back to the Ford GT40 race car from 1964, developed to beat Ferrari at the famous Le Mans 24-hour endurance race. The nameplate was first revived by Ford in 2004, and then once again for the 2017 model year. Production of the second-generation Ford GT began in late 2016, exactly 50 years after Ford’s legendary win at Le Mans with the GT40.

The latest Ford GT is a sleek, powerful sports car. The unique rear-end design was made with peak aero performance in mind. The large adjustable wing in the back can adapt, depending on the amount of downforce required at the time.

Honda Civic Type R

Honda Civic Type R seen at the New York International Auto...
Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Type R is a sporty version of the Honda Civic. It has been around since the 1990s, the latest FK8 Civic Type R based on the 10th-generation Civic debuted for the 2017 model year. The American variant of the Type R peaks at 306 horsepower, while the European/Japanese version produces 10 horsepower more. Either way, the Type R is one of the best sporty cars in its price range.

One of the highlights of the FK8 Civic Type R is its aggressive exterior styling. The large wing on the back, as well as the rear diffuser and three exhaust tips make the Type R easy to distinguish from the base model.

Lexus RC F Track Edition

2019 Chicago Auto Show Media Preview - Day 1
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

The rare RC F Track Edition is a souped-up variant of the Lexus RC F sports car. Some of the upgrades exclusive to the Track Edition include carbon-ceramic brake rotors, a lightweight titanium exhaust system, 19-inch wheels as well as many elements made from carbon-fiber. In effect, the track-oriented coupe is nearly 200 pounds lighter than the standard RC F.

The easiest way to distinguish the Track Edition from a base model RC F is by the Track Edition’s large carbon-fiber wing fixed on the trunk. The Lexus RC F Track Edition was unveiled back in 2019.

Nissan GTR R35 Nismo

The Nissan GTR Nismo...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The souped-up NISMO variant of the Nissan GTR R35 developed by Nissan’s Motorsport division first debuted in 2013. Back then, the automobile made headlines as it had claimed the world’s fastest production car record around the Nurburgring’s Nordschleife loop, lapping the track in 7 minutes and 8 seconds.

The exterior design of the Nismo is a lot more aggressive than the base model. The R35’s standard wing was gone in favor of a larger carbon-fiber rear spoiler that dramatically improved the car’s aero performance.

Subaru WRX STI

Jaennerrallye 2020
Markus Tobisch/SEPA.Media /Getty Images
Markus Tobisch/SEPA.Media /Getty Images

The Subaru WRX STI, formerly referred to as the Subaru Impreza WRX STI, is a legendary Japanese sports car that dates back to the 1990s. The latest variant of the WRX STI based on the fourth-generation Subaru Impreza was discontinued in 2016. The iconic nameplate has not made a return since then.

Subaru has made it easy not to mistake the WRX STI for a regular Impreza. The souped-up WRX STI packs a 305-horsepower 2.5L flat-four under the hood, as well as cosmetic upgrades to look the part. Among them is a colossal rear wing.

Porsche Panamera Turbo

88th Geneva International Motor Show Press Days
Robert Hradil/Getty Images
Robert Hradil/Getty Images

Without a doubt, the second-generation Porsche Panamera is fitted with one of the coolest rear spoilers in the entire automotive industry. It may not be as large or obnoxious as some of the other wings in this list, though it is one of the most technologically-advanced ones.

One of the coolest features of the latest, second-generation Panamera 4-door sedan is definitely its active, split rear wing. It can only be found in the high trims such as the Panamera Turbo. The wing deploys seamlessly from the rear of the car and extends into three different sections. It is worth purchasing a Panamera Turbo simply to see the state-of-the-art mechanism at work!

AMG Project One

IAA Cars 2017
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images
Gerlach Delissen/Corbis via Getty Images

The AMG Project One is perhaps the most hardcore road-going Mercedes-Benz ever made. The concept was first unveiled in 2017 by seven-time Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton, who had worked on the development of the car. Mercedes-Benz confirmed a short production run limited to just 275 units, all of which were sold at $2.72 million each. The first units are expected to be delivered from 2021 onwards.

Project One uses technology derived from Formula-One to achieve the best performance possible. The car is powered by a 1.6L hybrid V6 that is expected to deliver anywhere between 600 and 1000 horsepower. The aerodynamic exterior of the car features a large fin mounted on the back, as opposed to a typical rear-wing.

Chevrolet Corvette Z06

North American International Auto Show 2015 - Press Preview
Scott Legato/WireImage
Scott Legato/WireImage

The rear wing on the Chevrolet Corvette C7 Z06 is perhaps the smallest one in this entire list. Nonetheless, its stylish design and aero features are most certainly worth mentioning. The performance trim of the C7 Corvette was introduced for the 2015 model year.

As the Z06 was developed with performance in mind, the exterior was modified to improve the car’s aerodynamic capabilities. Changes included an-all new hood, a removable carbon-fiber roof, larger air vents, and of course the striking carbon-fiber rear wing.

Jaguar XFR-S

Jaguar Land Rover Press Conference at the 2012 LA Auto Show
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for Jaguar Land Rover
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for Jaguar Land Rover

Believe it or not, Jaguar does still make exciting high-performance cars. Of course, there is the 2-door F Type, but the British automaker had also released a track-oriented variant of the XF sedan. Jaguar successfully turned a bland sedan into an exciting, high-performance saloon.

The XFR-S is powered by the same turbocharged 5.0L V8 found in the XKRS, which is rated at around 550 horsepower. Wider front grills with large intakes, a rear diffuser, and a large rear wing were all added to the exterior to improve the aerodynamic capabilities of the car.

Lamborghini Aventador SV

The Lamborghini Aventador SV
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

Prior to the previously-mentioned Lamborghini Aventador SVJ, the Aventador SuperVeloce (or SV for short) was the high-performance, powerful variant of the Aventador supercar. The Italian manufacturer reduced the weight of the supercar by over 100 pounds, while also adding 50 horsepower more than the regular Aventador.

The SV is not just more powerful than a standard Aventador. The exterior of the car was changed, and a large aggressive spoiler was added to the rear of the car along with an all-new rear bumper design. In effect, the SuperVeloce generates 180% more downforce than a base Aventador! The production of the Aventador SV ceased in 2017.

Lamborghini Countach LP400 S

The London Concours
John Keeble/Getty Images
John Keeble/Getty Images

The Countach is more than just a Lamborghini. This Italian supercar became an icon of the 1980s. It also made countless appearances in pop culture around the world. Leonardo DiCaprio drove a shiny white Countach in the Wolf of Wall Street, for example.

The Countach remains one of the most outrageous high-performance automobiles of all time. The car’s powerful V12 motor felt overpowered, making the car unpredictable at high speeds. The massive wing, an optional feature available for the LP400 S, actually worsened the car’s top speed! Wingless variants of the Countach were able to drive over 10 mph quicker than the ones with the V-shaped wing.

RUF CTR2 Sport

86ème salon international de l'automobile de Geneve 2016
Jean-Marc ZAORSKI/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Jean-Marc ZAORSKI/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

The RUF CTR2 was developed as the successor to the CTR Yellowbird, which was once the fastest production car in the world. The CTR2 was based on the 993 generation of the Porsche 911. The German manufacturer only built 24 units of the CTR2 between 1995 and 1997, 12 of which were the souped-up CTR2 Sport variant.

The RUF CTR2 was one of the fastest production cars available at the time. The air-cooled sports car was able to accelerate to 60 miles per hour in below 3.5 seconds, while the top speed was reportedly 220 mph. At the time of its release in 1995, it was the world’s fastest production car of all time.

BMW 3.0 CSL

1974 BMW 3
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

The sole reason this car was born was to meet the requirements set by the FIA in order to participate in the European Touring Car Championship in 1972. BMW had to create a road-going variant of the race car to be eligible to enter the series.

The 3.0 CSL is based on a BMW E9. The vehicle was fitted with an aero package that included a large rear spoiler. The intimidating exterior design of the 3.0 CSL was instantly recognizable in motorsport. The car was quickly nicknamed the Batmobile due to its aero package.

Ferrari F40

The Ferrari F40...
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images
Martyn Lucy/Getty Images

The F40 simply had to appear in this list. Much like the Countach, it is one of the most iconic cars of all time. Today, the Ferrari F40 is highly sought-after by collectors. The price of a Ferrari F40 can easily surpass $1 million at auctions. 1,315 units were made in total before production stopped in 1992.

The exterior design of the F40 is simply unmistakable. Designed by Italian Pininfarina, it is hands-down one of the best-looking supercars ever. The iconic rear wing helped improve the aero capabilities of the F40.

Dodge Charger Daytona

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona
1969 Dodge Charger Daytona. (Photo by Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images)
1969 Dodge Charger Daytona. (Photo by Barrett-Jackson via Getty Images)

The first-generation Dodge Charger Daytona is an icon of American motorsport. The car was first unveiled in 1969, the modified variant of the Charger muscle car featured notable performance and motorsport success. The cars were quickly nicknamed the “Winged Warriors”. Buddy Baker made history in 1970 when he was clocked in at over 200 miles per hour for the first time ever in the history of NASCAR. As you can guess, Baker was behind the wheel of a Charger Daytona.

The car’s gigantic rear wing improved the aerodynamic capabilities of the car. After a successful season in 1969, NASCAR banned aero features on cars with engines larger than 300 cubic inches.

Porsche 911 993 GT2

Porsche 993 GT2 Street & Porsche 991.2 GT2 RS, Delmas
Peet Mocke/Future Publishing via Getty Images
Peet Mocke/Future Publishing via Getty Images

The GT2 moniker first appeared on a Porsche 911 in the 1990s, when the German automaker had to create roadgoing versions of their race car in order to compete in the FIA GT2 league. This resulted in the birth of one of the most hardcore Porsches ever made.

The GT2 packed a turbocharged powerplant that delivered 450 horsepower to the rear wheels! To improve the car’s stability at high speeds and improve the overall aero performance, Porsche fitted a huge wing on the rear. Only 57 units of the GT2 were made in total and they’re highly sought-after by wealthy automobile collectors today.

Porsche Rauh-Welt Begriff

Porsche RWB on display at the Essen Motor Show on December...
Maik Boenisch/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images
Maik Boenisch/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Akira Nakai San is the founder of Rauh-Welt Begriff, a Japanese company that specializes in modifying older generations of the Porsche 911. Akira Nakai transforms each and every RWB Porsche himself, and he has built cars all around the globe.

While the wings fitted on Rauh-Welt Porsche 911s are anything but stock, they do deserve an honorable mention in this list. Contrary to popular belief, the cars’ obnoxiously wide fenders and gigantic wings are designed for racing. Rauh-Welt Porsches are famous for competing in the annual Idlers 12-hour endurance race in Japan.